Forum Sponsorsss


Forums General General Discussion
  • Topic: Raised Bench work & Curves?

    Back To Topics
    (0 rates)
    • July 5, 2020 9:20 PM EDT
      • Port Orchard, Washington
         
      • Posts
        2,434
      • Thanks
        102
      • Thanked
        308

      Raised Bench work & Curves?

      Following in the footsteps of the giants in this hobby, I'm building layout 2.0 as a raised bed ala; Port Orford style, etc..

       

      I get the idea for long straight sections (2x4 framing, square joints, etc) but how do you folks deal with curved track? 

       

      Option 1; continue with square framing, curve cutting through the square sections?

      Option 2; curve the baseboard sections to fit the curve, keeping the track and roadbed X number of feet wide?

       

      Thoughts?

    • July 6, 2020 12:51 AM EDT
      • Port Orchard, Washington
         
      • Posts
        2,434
      • Thanks
        102
      • Thanked
        308

      Rick,

      I've been following your build. What did you use for the side pieces along the curves? My curves are somewhere in the 9' radius range.

    • July 6, 2020 4:29 AM EDT
      • Bundaberg, Queensland Australia
         
      • Posts
        446
      • Thanks
        13
      • Thanked
        130

      This how I did my elevated multi level railway with curves the high trestle is on a radius of over 10 Feet the low trestle is about 8 feet.

      https://ringbalin-light-railway.blogspot.com/p/build-stage-1.html

      The other curves are 5 foot and 6 foot but I am running small locos and shortish trains.

      My longest straights are over 7.5 Metres.

      The base boards are made of fibre cement either 6mm or 4.5 mm which can be bent to form curve side pieces and are weatherproof.

      Link to my blog detailing how I am doing mine.

       

      This post was edited by GAP at July 6, 2020 4:29 AM EDT
    • July 6, 2020 4:37 AM EDT
      • West Grove, Pennsylvania
         
      • Posts
        11,223
      • Thanks
        859
      • Thanked
        1,257

      I'm not exactly sure what you mean, Craig, unless you're building your layout the same way Rick built his. 

      On mine the bench work is square with a ladder roadbed built on top of that. Basically the same way Richard Smith built his, except it's all PVC.

      And the track is all flex track so it just followed the curve i made in the ladder. 

      ____________________________________

      "Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --Martin Luther King Jr

    • July 6, 2020 9:42 AM EDT
      • Port Orchard, Washington
         
      • Posts
        2,434
      • Thanks
        102
      • Thanked
        308

      Ken,

      I'm building in a similar manner as you built. A 2x4 frame, every 2' or so a cross 2x4 for bracing. Then covered with chicken wire/landscape fabric followed by a ladder roadbed (ripped cedar strips). I wanted to try PVC but its hard to find beyond trim boards here in the PNW when cedar is cheap! 

       

      This method works great for straight track as it's relatively easy to build straigh sections.

       

      I've got a series of 90 degree curves, and I'm wondering how to approach this. Since the curves are approx. 9' radius (18' diameter), it seems reasonable to make the Bench work follow the arc of the curve. 

       

      I will try and grab some photos to explain later.

       

      To add to the complications, I have to also have the roadbed drop at a 4% grade, but that's a easily solvable problem...

       

       

    • July 6, 2020 10:14 AM EDT
      • Candlewood Valley, Connecticut
         
      • Posts
        13,754
      • Thanks
        1,489
      • Thanked
        1,095

      Hi Craig -  You can build your framework in square steps, but leave the ends long and cut to match the arc. A thin piece of Cedar, say 1/2" or less will probably conform to the frame as a fascia board, similar to how the ladder is curved.

      ____________________________________

      www.cvsry.com www.cvsry.com

    • July 6, 2020 10:31 AM EDT
      • Port Orchard, Washington
         
      • Posts
        2,434
      • Thanks
        102
      • Thanked
        308

      I need to scope out the local box store today and see if I can find some thin cedar trim for a fascia board. I can't quite rip a 2x6 on the table saw in the 5.5" dimension very well... And 3.5" probably wouldn't be strong enough. I'm rereading Rock's postings and it looks like he has a fascia board the whole length, not just the curves.

    • July 6, 2020 11:39 AM EDT
      • Southern Oregon
         
      • Posts
        1,972
      • Thanks
        525
      • Thanked
        1,034

      Hi Craig,

      I use LP (Louisiana Pacific) lap siding, it is an OSB material that comes in 8 in wide by 16 foot pieces.  It is wood grain finished and primed on one side about 10-11 bucks a piece.

      https://lpcorp.com/products/exterior/siding-trim/products/lap-siding   Usually found at more independent lumber dealers rather than the Big Box.

       

      I rip it in half and get 32 foot of fascia from each piece.  I prime all sides and put on one coat of finish paint (all sides) before installing.  Any cut ends during install I coat with TiteBondIII.

      Yes I use it for all fascia; curves as well as straight sections.  I have taken it down to 6 foot radius but it likes 8 foot or more for ease of install.   Had this installed on my old railroad for almost 10 years and the only issue I had was some swelling at the ends of the pieces but no rot or decay.

       

      Hardware cloth support;

      No matter how well you brace it the wire cloth will sag from the weight of the soil.  In a 2 foot span it can sag an inch or more, you say your using ladder road bed, that's good so no problem there. Adding more soil to keep the top level just wants to sag the wire more.

      I keep my supports no more than 12 inches on center. For instance I build a 3' by 8' module; I frame it using 2x4  PT and put in 2x4 cross members on 2' centers then rip 2x4 in half and use these ripped pieces between the framing members.

        

       

    • July 6, 2020 12:12 PM EDT
      • Port Orchard, Washington
         
      • Posts
        2,434
      • Thanks
        102
      • Thanked
        308

      Rick,

      Thanks for the info. I've only built a small test section last summer (4' square) and noticed that 2' spacing seemed to work for the amount of dirt/sand that I added without too much sagging. But I will have to plan on the 1' spacing here on out. It sounds like a framing pattern of 2x4 @2' centers works good if you add 1x2 supports every 1'.

       

      When I saw OSB siding, I got worried for a second, but then realized duh, that same siding would be exposed on a house. I think the paint is probably a key factor.

    • July 6, 2020 2:31 PM EDT
      • West Grove, Pennsylvania
         
      • Posts
        11,223
      • Thanks
        859
      • Thanked
        1,257

      Craig, what I used was trim stuff called Trimplank. 

      1x3" trim for the ladder and 1x6" for the support under it. 6" apart. 

      On top of that was the mesh and weed block. The side piece is called brick molding. 

      ____________________________________

      "Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --Martin Luther King Jr

    • July 6, 2020 6:41 PM EDT
      • Port Orchard, Washington
         
      • Posts
        2,434
      • Thanks
        102
      • Thanked
        308

      I will have to look and price that stuff next time I'm at the big box store. I once asked if they carried sheets of PVC board like you guys on the east coast have. They laughed and laughed after giving me a quote of a $500 min. order (2 sheets) plus almost another $1200 in shipping costs. I'm pretty sure they have PVC trim boards but that's about it.

    • July 6, 2020 7:00 PM EDT
      • Southern Oregon
         
      • Posts
        1,972
      • Thanks
        525
      • Thanked
        1,034

      Craig,

      I buy pVC sheet, 1/4 inch  4 x 8 sheets for right at 100 bucks from a local sign shop in Medford. I think the big box pricing on this stuff is crazy high in our area.

    • July 6, 2020 7:13 PM EDT
      • Port Orchard, Washington
         
      • Posts
        2,434
      • Thanks
        102
      • Thanked
        308

      I have a couple plastic supply places within an hour drive and I'm tempted to call them to see what the price would be for 4x8 PVC sheets. Years ago I bought 1/8 and 1/16 styrene in 4x8 and I'm finally running low, so I think when I got get more styrene sheets I see about PVC.

    • July 6, 2020 7:24 PM EDT
      • Port Orchard, Washington
         
      • Posts
        2,434
      • Thanks
        102
      • Thanked
        308

      Rick,

      You just use PVC for buildings, correct and not for the layout?

    • July 6, 2020 9:24 PM EDT
      • Southern Oregon
         
      • Posts
        1,972
      • Thanks
        525
      • Thanked
        1,034

      Craig Townsend said:

      Rick,

      You just use PVC for buildings, correct and not for the layout?

       

       

       

      Yes, that is correct.

       

    • July 6, 2020 9:29 PM EDT
      • Southern Oregon
         
      • Posts
        1,972
      • Thanks
        525
      • Thanked
        1,034

      Craig Townsend said:

      I have a couple plastic supply places within an hour drive and I'm tempted to call them to see what the price would be for 4x8 PVC sheets. Years ago I bought 1/8 and 1/16 styrene in 4x8 and I'm finally running low, so I think when I got get more styrene sheets I see about PVC.

       

       

       

      I buy a lot of Styrene sheet from these folks, good service

      https://www.estreetplastics.com/Styrene-Sheets-s/23.htm

    • July 6, 2020 9:54 PM EDT
      • Port Orchard, Washington
         
      • Posts
        2,434
      • Thanks
        102
      • Thanked
        308

      I've got Interstate Plastics local. A buddy of mine just got a 4x8 sheet of 1/16 for under $30. Can't go wrong at that price!

       

      If I can remember my flickr password I will try and upload some photos of the building area.

    • July 7, 2020 4:14 PM EDT
      • Port Orchard, Washington
         
      • Posts
        2,434
      • Thanks
        102
      • Thanked
        308

      So my local big box store doesn't have PVC boards that I could find, but they did have some Hardieplank Cement boards used for siding, so maybe that might be a good substitute? A 4x8 sheet is $30, with strips (1x6) around $8 for 12 feet of length.

       

      Humm...

    • July 7, 2020 4:23 PM EDT
      • Candlewood Valley, Connecticut
         
      • Posts
        13,754
      • Thanks
        1,489
      • Thanked
        1,095

      I saw some Hardieplaks Siding - very wide, maybey 9" at work today; it's left over from a job in what looks like 12 or 16 foot lengths. I can test the flexibility for you. How tight of a radius will you need to bend it?  I know thin strips are easy to break as I snapped some 1.5" starter strips by hand to fit in the trash.

       

      I'm guessing it will do R8' (16' dia) but probably not much tighter.

       

       

      ____________________________________

      www.cvsry.com www.cvsry.com

Forums General General Discussion

    Icon Legend

  • Topic has replies
    Hot topic
    Topic unread
    Topic doesn't have any replies
    Closed topic
    BBCode  is enabled
    HTML  is enabled

Add Reputation

Do you want to add reputation for this user by this post?

or cancel

Ads by Google