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    • August 1, 2019 11:11 PM EDT
      • Post Falls, Idaho
         
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      Slab jig version 2.0 is in the works. On the original I used a deep 1/2 wide straight bit. Because it was long it cleared the 3/4" thick bottom "runners" of the jig easily. But being primarily a side cut bit as opposed to a bottom cutting bit and so narrow it required many passes and was pretty rough, requiring a bit of sanding. 

       

      So I bought a bottom cutting surfacing bit that is, if I recall, 7/8ths wide. It's made for a cnc router for this exact purpose, make flat surface cuts. But it is a very shallow bit and at max depth of the router and with as much shank as i dare leave out of the router it just didn't clear the 3/4" runners enough for my liking. 

       

      So I got some scrap L bracket shelving stuff from work. This will replace the 3/4" runners with about 1/16th inch metal. That should give me enough clearance. I also made a plate for the router that fits between the L brackets to guide the router better than I was doing it. I also bought a package of two wood rulers from the dollar store that I will inlay into each side so I can adjust the height off the table without the need to measure with a tape measure. When I get it done I will give you guys a better look at it. 

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    • August 1, 2019 11:29 PM EDT
      • Waverly, Alabama
         
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      Will you be selling kits, Devon 

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    • August 2, 2019 6:20 AM EDT
      • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
         
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      Gee Devon, making the tool sounds like a major building project in itself.

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      Shannon car Shops
      Home of the infamous leg lamp

      I.A.R.R.R. Member #12

      and King Butt Modeler

    • August 2, 2019 9:18 AM EDT
      • Post Falls, Idaho
         
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      No kits, lol. 

       

      David, jig making can be it's own hobby. I rather enjoying making various jigs and tools to get jobs done. I have made several over the years some good some not so good. Its born out of being both cheap and creative. 

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    • August 2, 2019 10:45 AM EDT
      • Saint Helena, CALIFORNIA
         
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      This is one of my favorite woodworking sites - Woodgears

       

      I especially like the machinery, techniques, jigs and shop trick sections; a bit of something for everyone.

    • August 2, 2019 11:38 AM EDT
      • Vail, Az
         
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      This is where I get my band saw blades and where I drool over tools I'll never own... it too is a learning site.

      https://www.highlandwoodworking.com/

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      John

       

      The older I get, the less I know, please don't make me prove it.

       

       

    • August 2, 2019 4:31 PM EDT
      • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
         
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      Devon Sinsley said:

      No kits, lol. 

       

      David, jig making can be it's own hobby. I rather enjoying making various jigs and tools to get jobs done. I have made several over the years some good some not so good. Its born out of being both cheap and creative. 

      Yea, I am a cheep bast person too. I have made some goofy rigs to get the job done.

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      Shannon car Shops
      Home of the infamous leg lamp

      I.A.R.R.R. Member #12

      and King Butt Modeler

    • August 2, 2019 9:02 PM EDT
      • Rooster Works "Area 69" ,
         
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      "Back Yard" black walnut tree shelving in the kitchen with USB charging outlets above the shelving. Only thing the boy asked for an granted ...the USB outlets are way faster than the plug adapter.

       

       

      The fridge is a 21 cu Whirlpool with a vinyl wrap. (bass was caught measured weighted and released only a fiberglass replica mounted on red oak.

       

    • August 2, 2019 9:08 PM EDT
      • Rooster Works "Area 69" ,
         
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      Dragon light is on live edge back yard walnut as well....

    • August 2, 2019 9:12 PM EDT
      • Rooster Works "Area 69" ,
         
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      The vinyl fridge wrap is a cheat but works

       

    • August 2, 2019 9:13 PM EDT
      • Scottsdale, Arizona
         
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      So what were the dimensions of the Bass?  Not the Fisherman's dimension, the actual dimensions.

      Pictures or it did not happen.

      This post was edited by Colin Criswell at August 2, 2019 9:15 PM EDT
    • August 2, 2019 9:35 PM EDT
      • Saint Johns, Florida
         
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      If the bass was "weighted" did he sink when you put him back in the water?

      BTW I have one of those bass on a plaque too. Mine sings a song and moves when someone passes in front of him!

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    • August 3, 2019 12:38 PM EDT
      • Post Falls, Idaho
         
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      Gotta love the backyard trees.

       

      So as promised here is flattening sled 2.0. Here is the new surfacing bit

       

       

      and the new router bottom plate

       

       

      And the new rulers one on each side. The are set to measure the bottom of the sled runners from the table. Not the nit height. Makes no difference really what it measures as it is all arbitrary. Is more about getting both sides the same height off the table so you get a flat surface.

       

      The sides

       

       

      The runners

       

       

      Old router looks a little used but for 5 bucks it works well. I took it apart and cleaned and waxed the important parts.

       

       

      And finally the bit below the runners.

       

       

      I haven't fired it up yet. I am building another new toy a 24" thickness sander.

       

       

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    • August 3, 2019 12:41 PM EDT
      • Post Falls, Idaho
         
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      Mark Hadler said:

      This is one of my favorite woodworking sites - Woodgears

       

      I especially like the machinery, techniques, jigs and shop trick sections; a bit of something for everyone.

      Hey thats a cool website. Thanks for the link

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    • August 4, 2019 8:36 PM EDT
      • Post Falls, Idaho
         
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      So I said I haven't used the new and improved flattening sled because I started building a thickness sander. So a planer is nice to get wood down to thickness fast but doesn't always do the cleanest job. I have access to a 12" planer so I decided instead of adding a planer to my shop I wanted a thickness sander. I can get wood to a desired thickness but can also make nice smooth panels. But I don't have the money to drop on a good thickness sander so I decided to build one. There are tons of videos on Youtube on the subject. Its not a hard concept. Make a drum, true it to an adjustable table and you are on your way. I had an old lathe that went TU. That gave me a motor and a set of pulleys. The rest is scratch built. Here is where it is so far.

       

      So next up I need to cut 32- 3/4" X 31/2" discs and epoxy them onto the rod to make the 24"drum. And make the motor mount. As an addition on the end I will make  12" disk sander. So this will be a complete sanding station.

       

      There is a downside to this style of thickness sander. Since the thickness is set by a table that pivots on a pendulum the thinner you go the steeper the table angle and your wood heads for the ground. It limits the length of the wood. It does short stuff really well. If you need to do longer stuff and there is a possibility of hitting the floor on the outfeed the answer is to use sheet foam under the wood to make it "thicker" than it is and then this reduces the table angle. Not a cure all but for about $100 bucks I'll have a 22" wide thickness sander that will 90% of what I need it to do.

      This post was edited by Devon Sinsley at August 24, 2019 2:01 AM EDT
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    • August 19, 2019 3:20 PM EDT
      • Post Falls, Idaho
         
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      I decided that a 3" drum was too small. I wanted closer to a 5" drum. Working for a water district I have access to pipe. The PVC water pipe most commonly used out int he road is what is called C900 it is a much thicker wall than traditional PVC. As such it has a large diameter for its nominal size. 4" C900 has a diameter of just shy of 5". And with the thick wall will allow me to take a fair amount of material off if need be to get it true to the shaft/table. So I cut a piece of scrap pipe 24" long. made two 3/4" plywood disks to fit in either end. I cut them large and spun them on my lathe and sanded them to the right diameter. I made them fit nice and snug then screwed them in from the outside of the drum. I put it on the shaft and put the bearings on and surprisingly it sits very close to true as it is. It won't require the removal of much material to make it perfect. I should end up with a drum about 4 3/4" in diameter. This give me a much faster surface speed per minute for the same RPMs. What this means is that I will sand faster but at the same RPM because there is more linear inches of sand paper on a larger drum. It causes the surface to be sanded quicker and thereby spending less time in contact withe drum and a longer piece of sand paper so it won't heat up as fast. So here is the start of my drum. It will need some collars on each end that will be glued and screwed to the ends and then have set screws to tighten it onto the shaft. Once that is done it will be bolted back into place and then I will fire it up and use a block of wood with sand paper on it to true the drum to the shaft and table so that it sands uniform and smooth. Actually next is to make the motor mount.

       

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    • August 19, 2019 6:46 PM EDT
      • Waverly, Alabama
         
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      C900????  What's wrong with good ol' DI? 

       

      I'm certainly following this build with great interest, Devon.  Looks good so far, carry on!!

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    • August 19, 2019 7:02 PM EDT
      • Post Falls, Idaho
         
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      Dan Hilyer said:

      C900????  What's wrong with good ol' DI? 

       

      I'm certainly following this build with great interest, Devon.  Looks good so far, carry on!!

      I don't have the patience that would be required to sand down ductile iron to make it true lol. Not to mention it would be a bit heavy. I am surprised you didn't ask why a tare district has green C-900 instead of blue or white. I have no idea where we got this stuff. Looks like poopy pipe.

      This post was edited by Devon Sinsley at August 19, 2019 7:04 PM EDT
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    • August 19, 2019 8:47 PM EDT
      • Waverly, Alabama
         
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      Sanding ..... are you sure that stuff draining from your skull is not actually your brain??  Think ..... prime opportunity to get that metal lathe you've been wanting but just didn't have an excuse!!  Excuse now provided  That green C900 may be poopy force main pipe, hopefully unused 

      This post was edited by Dan Hilyer at August 19, 2019 8:47 PM EDT
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