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  • Topic: BUILDING THE C & AV, or, WHAT HAVE I GOTTEN MYSELF INTO?

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    • October 2, 2017 5:22 AM EDT
      • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
         
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      I used basswood shingles on my feed and grain building. Even though I sealed them well with spar varnish, they eventually cupped and split. I ended up re shingling the roof with asphalt shingles.

       

      In the home improvement stores they sell "grit" that is designed to be mixed with paint to create a rough surface. Its a real fine sand. You might try that.

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      Shannon car Shops
      Home of the infamous leg lamp

      I.A.R.R.R. Member #12

      and King Butt Modeler

    • October 2, 2017 7:34 AM EDT
      • Burke, Virginia
         
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      Gregory Hile said:

      <snip>
      Okay, here's where I need some help. Here is the latest iteration of the SketchUp file. The colors are standard Southern Pacific colors for that era. The brownish band around the lower portion of the building is not the same as the trim that goes around the doors and windows, et al. but is supposed to be a "dark yellow." I'm still working on figuring out exactly what "dark yellow" looks like, but what the railroad was mix the paint with sand to give it more texture and some greater protection from people, baggage carts, horse carriages, and the like.


      My question is: what's the best way to model the sandy texture? Because they sell prototype Southern Pacific colors, I will be using Tru-Color, which the manufacturer describes as an "acrylic solvent based" paint.

      That's all for now. Thanks!!!

      Very nice work.

      I would be very leery of using Tru-Color unless it's designed for outdoor.    I know you said you don't want house paint, but Home Depot sells samples of outdoor paint that you can get mixed to any color you like.   They only cost around $4 for 8 ounces.   Do NOT go to Lowes - their samples are interior only.   I suspect you could mix some sand in that, but I haven't tried it.   Some of my buildings painted with the samples have been out more than 12 years and still look great.

       

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      Bruce

      http://jbrr.com/

       

    • October 2, 2017 7:42 AM EDT
      • Southern Illinois
         
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      Welcome Gregory, or can we call you Greg?  Nice work and the location of your railroad looks like a great railroad setup.  Please continue to post.

    • October 2, 2017 11:12 AM EDT
      • Martinez, California
         
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      Thanks for the comments so far! Yes, by all means, call me Greg!

      Anyone have experience using Tru-Color paints outdoors? My resistance to using exterior latex house paint mostly has to do with the extra steps necessary to color-match, and to thin and strain it if I wanted to use an airbrush.

      As for sand, I'll check out the grit. Sounds promising.

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    • October 2, 2017 11:56 AM EDT
      • Curmudgeon at Large, Insurance Warrior
         
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      Greg,

       

      I will second what Bruce has stated above. Craft paints are great for indoor, non-weather related applications, but are not designed to stand up to the rigors of the out of doors. As for color matching, I had HD color match some paint to the colors of our club patch, and if it is different, my eyes sure cannot tell the difference.

       

      Air brushing is a great way to paint, but for all the outdoor stuff I have painted, both hobby and non hobby, brush painting is as good as it gets. I pre-paint as much as I am able to do before assembly. I mask off the areas that will be glue surfaces to allow TiteBond III to get a good hold. When assembling I keep a supply of soft rags, dampened on hand to wipe off any excess glue that may squeeze out of joints. In most cases I also pin the joints with 22ga pins from a pin nailer. I am an air brush fan as well but sometimes it just isn't worth the effort, plus most air brushes don't have a large enough tip to allow that type of paint to be shot practically.

       

      In short, outdoor railroading requires a slight shift in how things are done, more to the 1:1 world of process. You will find that your railroad as a whole will be a new learning experience as techniques that work in small scale don't work well in large scale. Great looking projects, and a good looking railroad so far.

       

      Bob C.

      ____________________________________

      We don't stop playing with trains because we grow old, we grow old because we stop playing with trains.....

       

    • October 3, 2017 6:10 PM EDT
      • Martinez, California
         
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      Thanks for your comments everyone. I am doing some tests on several different substances and we'll see how they turn out.

      As for the use of Tru-Color paints outdoors, I contacted them and was told that they are UV-stable and suitable for outdoors. They also stated that they have been evaluated by USA Trains for outdoor use and "they like it." Keep in mind that I am modeling a 30-year old structure built in the 1870s, so a little natural weathering is to be expected and desirable. We'll see how it goes ...
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    • October 5, 2017 3:51 PM EDT
      • Martinez, California
         
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      Quick update: Thanks to everyone here and elsewhere who made suggestions regarding the texture issue. I tried out a number of them, including some colored sand I found at Hobby Lobby, and the best solution turned out to be Liquitex Ceramic Stucco. It achieved much the same overall visual effect as sand but it can be applied before painting rather than mixing it with or using a sifter to apply on wet paint, thereby giving me much more control over the process. In addition, the sand and other materials would rub off, whereas the stucco was far more permanent. I am sure there are other texture gels that would also do the trick. Kudos to Ray Dunakin for the suggestion.

      I also finally found a color sample of Southern Pacific Dark Yellow. Interestingly, I took it to Home Depot to match it and purchase a sample as Bruce had mentioned and they were not interested. I have had attitude issues with the paint department at my local HD in the past so i didn't press it.

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    • October 5, 2017 5:26 PM EDT
      • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
         
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      They don't want your money? I cannot understand when places are like that. But then I have been in customer service my whole working life.

      ____________________________________

      Shannon car Shops
      Home of the infamous leg lamp

      I.A.R.R.R. Member #12

      and King Butt Modeler

    • October 5, 2017 6:00 PM EDT
      • Curmudgeon at Large, Insurance Warrior
         
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      Greg,

       

      Get the store number and write a complaint to HD corporate. I have have very good success doing that. You have heard the old cliche that 'crap rolls downhill'? Next time you go in the store they will be falling all over each other to help you.

      ____________________________________

      We don't stop playing with trains because we grow old, we grow old because we stop playing with trains.....

       

    • October 5, 2017 7:57 PM EDT
      • Martinez, California
         
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      I used to work for an organization implementing and enforcing environmental agreements, mostly with large DIYs like HD and Lowe's, and with the too big to fail big banks. I worked with senior management all the way up to the CEO level. HD was "difficult" then and apparently still is at the store level on occasion, as well.
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    • October 5, 2017 7:57 PM EDT
      • Martinez, California
         
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      I used to work for an organization implementing and enforcing environmental agreements, mostly with large DIYs like HD and Lowe's, and with the too big to fail big banks. I worked with senior management all the way up to the CEO level. HD was "difficult" then and apparently still is at the store level on occasion, as well.
      ____________________________________

       

    • October 6, 2017 8:47 AM EDT
      • Easton , Massachusetts
         
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      So you are use to repeating your self!

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       My u-tube  My Vimeo

      The light in the tunnel might not be an engine , but a light in the caboose of my own train on my Roundy Round Rail Road !    My empire is complete...I think...

    • October 6, 2017 10:00 AM EDT
      • Martinez, California
         
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      Well, I usually have to in order to get a word in edgewise at home, but not here! Sorry about that! 

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