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    • August 29, 2020 1:36 PM EDT
    • I finally got a response from Richard F, who made the kits 20+ years ago. He confirmed the inspiration came from Stratton Brick Co, of Macon, Geargia, and sent this pic from his Glover Locomotives book:

       

       

      A bit more research (right, Rooster?,) and I found the Cherkee Brick Co History page:
      https://www.cherokeebrick.com/the-history-of-cherokee-brick/

      Cherokee bought Stratton in 1903. Both these 2 photos from the book are on this History page. The caption for the second, tipping car pic, says:
      "Cyrus Chambers, one of the visionaries and inventors of modern brick making, postulated that large scale brick making operations could succeed in the machine age using steam shovels to dig clay, rails to transport the earth and dump it into large hoppers at the machine house, where screening, mixing, tempering, molding, drying, and burning could occur with the clay never being touched by human hands. Through Chambers and 39 inventive genius and that of countless other inventors, new equipment emerged that permitted brick makers to dramatically increase production"

       

      So the loads were, as suspected, clay and other brick ingredients.  Heavy, dense material.  My problem is/was that they are labelled "Stratton Brick Ore Cars, when in fact they are clay carriers!

       

    • August 28, 2020 9:33 AM EDT
    • Rooster said:

      Page 8 and 9 tell the truth ! Exactly why 6 is afraid of 7 because 789 but there is always a 10 yummy!

      Researching what you said in your posts is almost as complex as the history.  I did find several references to a Mr Stratton in the mining docs for Cripple Creek - I think he owned the "Independence" mine on page 9.

       

      But I am currently thinking brick works in Georgia.

    • August 28, 2020 9:29 AM EDT
    • Rick Marty said:

      The cars being tippers and if used in the brick business they probably carried raw material, clay, sand, etc to the plant rather than finished bricks from the plant.  

      That's what I'm thinking. a brick works would be moving clay to the plant and that's a dense material that would likely stay put in an open car.

    • August 27, 2020 7:19 PM EDT
    • BTW ....Only mine I was ever involved with apparently turned into a gulch. But the Sanborne maps don't lie !

    • August 27, 2020 7:11 PM EDT
    • The cars being tippers and if used in the brick business they probably carried raw material, clay, sand, etc to the plant rather than finished bricks from the plant.  

    • August 27, 2020 7:08 PM EDT
    • Page 8 and 9 tell the truth ! Exactly why 6 is afraid of 7 because 789 but there is always a 10 yummy!

    • August 27, 2020 12:17 PM EDT
    • Either way, they were not sent very far.  Elsewise, the load would have shaken off the low side and be gone.

      That was my feeling.



      Typically there was a mechanism to lift the side boards and tip the car to one side or another.
      No expert but is this it? [link]

      If so then iron ore...

       Al, Jim - these don't have a side board to hold things in place. (The Bachmann Tippers do, so I left them out.)

       

      The manufacturer (Richard Finlayson, aka Trail Creek Models,) labelled them "Stratton Brick Co. Side Dump Ore Cars". I found a Stratton mentioned in the Cripple Creek/Victorville gold mining area of Colorado, but no pictures yet of these cars carrying a load.  There was also a Stratton Brick Co in Georgia, so the cars might have carried bricks?

       

    • August 27, 2020 6:25 AM EDT
    • One maker of these types of cars was Western Wheel Scraper.

       Back issues of NG&SLG have plans for some of these cars.

      Typically there was a mechanism to lift the side boards and tip the car to one side or another.

      These were typically used in railroad construction.

    • August 26, 2020 11:23 PM EDT
    • I think that the qestion to be asking is; where was this style car developed and who built them. With that information the, what were they hauling, would be easily answered.

      Can I contribute any solid information to answer your question, no. But I think the answer still lies in where the cars were develooped.

      Hope we find the answers as they are really neat cars and I would like to know more about them.

    • August 26, 2020 8:45 PM EDT
    • Keep in mind Pete that there were plenty of locally built stuff as well. Local carpenters and blacksmiths were pretty creative at copying an idea

    • August 26, 2020 8:33 PM EDT
    • Pete;

       

      I think I saw similar cars in the old film footage concerning the building of the Panama Canal.  They probably did not have to travel far before they got dumped.  Probably just held one scoop from a steam shovel.  Not sure whether your models are of cars that actually hauled ore or overburden.  Either way, they were not sent very far.  Elsewise, the load would have shaken off the low side and be gone.

       

      Regards, David Meashey

    • August 26, 2020 5:55 PM EDT
    • No expert but is this it? [link]

       

      If so then iron ore...

       

    • August 26, 2020 4:00 PM EDT
    • Here we have a pair of "ore" cars, one in 7/8ths scale, the other 1:20.3.  I hae never seen a photo of the prototypes in use and carrying 'ore'. What did they carry? Gold ore in Colorado? Bricks? Anyone know where I can find some prototype photos?

       

    • August 27, 2020 10:30 AM EDT
    • That's RIGHT up my alley, Bob!  Thanks!!!!

    • August 25, 2020 8:45 AM EDT
    • I found this site a couple of months ago, and forgot to share it.

       

      http://www.nashuacitystation.org/station/

       

      New England has some unique station designs.   I was looking for photos of the station in the town I grew up in, and ran across this site.

    • August 25, 2020 11:01 AM EDT
    • Ray;

       

      I have a copy of the book Scalded to Death by the Steam by Katie Letcher Lyle.  It has train wreck songs plus an account of the actual wreck.  Prior to WWII, train wreck songs were very popular, a bit like sad, sad country songs are today.

       

      Best, David Meashey

    • August 25, 2020 3:25 AM EDT
    • If the crew was lucky they were killed instantly by the blast. If they were unlucky enough to survive the blast they died of scalding.

       

       

    • August 22, 2020 3:54 PM EDT
    • Thanks Cliff;

       

      I had seen a few of those photos before.  We had a low water situation one day when I was working on the Crown Metal Products 4-4-0 at Hershey Park.  There was no explosion, but the solder core melted out of the safety plug in the crown sheet of the firebox.  155psi trying to get through a half inch hole makes a fearful roar.  It happened just as I was taking the last shovel of hot coals out of the firebox.  I jumped clean over my shovel without realizing it!  It sounded like an entire SAC squadron had scrambled right beside me.  Glad I was young.  If that happened now (I'm 74), I would probably be severely scrubbing my briefs!

       

      Best, David Meashey

    • August 25, 2020 3:13 AM EDT
    • I've heard of a lot of weird ideas that were tried in the early days of railroading, but that atmospheric railroad is new to me. 

       

      Also the compressed air "truck" loco. I've seen lots of photos of various compressed air locos, but nothing quite like that.