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    • August 24, 2019 4:37 AM EDT
    • Reminds me of a request a few Christmas's ago from some friends who had been somewhat taken, after a visit, by my garden railway, "Oh, could you bring it down so we all can have something to play with before Christmas dinner ?" Er, what ! Then did a bit of head scratching and remembered a shunting puzzle, I saw operated in 009 scale, at one of the shows here. Googled "Shunting Puzzle" and came up with, I think, "Inglenook".

       

      Just so happens I had some LGB R3 switches lying around awaiting sale (after wholesale change to R5) and some spare sections of LGB set track. Gathered it all up along with my R/C 0-6-0 live steamer (Roundhouse Lady Anne), its fuel, water, oil and basic tools, a selection of narrow gauge W&L railway wagons, the track plan, a packet of Post-It notes and headed down to my friends for Christmas celebrations. Took about 10 minutes to set up in their back yard on a patch of concrete.

       

      Hosts and guests were on it for most of the day, excepting lunch. We only stopped when it got dark and the Xmas special of "Dr Who" was about to start on the TV. One of my friends, a computer software engineer by trade (I wonder why he liked the shunting puzzle so much ?), was most miffed when he was beaten on time by another guest's 10 year old daughter, who though a total novice, was handling the controls of the live steam loco as though she had been born with a Spektrum DX6 in her hands. 

    • August 24, 2019 2:24 AM EDT
    • what warning did you receive?

       

    • August 24, 2019 1:35 AM EDT
    • Hi Greg

      I had the same trouble as Tom until I ignored the warning from firefox and went to the pictures location, then when I came back the pictured had shown up in your first post.

      Mick

    • August 23, 2019 9:34 PM EDT
    • don't know what to tell you, I can see it https:// and http://

       

      It's your computer or browser

       

      go to my web site:  https://elmassian.com/index.php/large-scale-train-main-page/others-layouts/timesaver-switching-layout

       

      Greg

    • August 23, 2019 8:41 PM EDT
    • Greg

      I get the same results as with the other posting.

      Tom

       

    • August 22, 2019 9:12 PM EDT
    • here it is from my site:

       

    • August 22, 2019 8:58 PM EDT
    • Greg Elmassian said:

      tom, use https:// to access largescalecentral...

       

      Greg

      I am using https;// to acccess largescalecentral.

      This is the first picture I haven't seen in while.

      Tom

       

    • August 21, 2019 11:48 PM EDT
    • tom, use https:// to access largescalecentral...

       

    • August 21, 2019 9:06 PM EDT
    • Colin Criswell said:

      On the switching layout our club has and bring to our module events has a transformer that can be set at a slow speed so the locomotive does not run off the track and will not harm the bumpers at the ends of each siding.  We also use a toggle switch for the forward and reverse.  This way the kids only have to use the toggle switch to move the locomotive.  Another thing we use is hook and loop couplers.  By giving the operator (kid) an old credit card or hotel card they can slide it down between the 2 cars that they want to uncouple and move the other car away.  The switching layout is not a timesaver, but does have a main line and 3 sidings.  2 sidings can hold 2 cars max. and the other 3 cars max.  The mainline will only hold the loco and 2 cars.  We also use small cars like the Hartland mini cars and an Aristo Lil Critter for the motive power.  There are 6 cars on the various sidings when the child starts.  The cars are all numbered.  They then pull 3 cards from a deck of 6 cards.  This tells them the cars they have to pick up and in what order.  So with the mainline lining up with the straight siding that will hold 3 cars it makes it a challenge to clear that track and get the cars in order to have the loco and 3 cars on that track.  We have been using this switching module for over 10 years and it has been a big success with the little ones at the events.  It was originally made for the Boy Scouts Scout-O-Rama and is one requirement for their Railroading Merit Badge. 

       

      Edit:  I wish I had a picture of it.  The next time we have it up, I will take a picture.

       

      I love the idea that a simple model railroad setup could serve as a fun instructional tool for young people, for over a decade. 

    • August 21, 2019 8:45 PM EDT
    • Greg Elmassian said:

      Greg

      Your picture doesn't show up for me. I have tried Firefox and MS Edge.

      When I use Firefox and ask for View Image, it gives me a security warning. It says Do Not Continue To SDGRS.COM.

      Edge just shows a little image like a very small piece of paper.

      Tom

       

    • August 21, 2019 6:42 PM EDT
    • On the switching layout our club has and bring to our module events has a transformer that can be set at a slow speed so the locomotive does not run off the track and will not harm the bumpers at the ends of each siding.  We also use a toggle switch for the forward and reverse.  This way the kids only have to use the toggle switch to move the locomotive.  Another thing we use is hook and loop couplers.  By giving the operator (kid) an old credit card or hotel card they can slide it down between the 2 cars that they want to uncouple and move the other car away.  The switching layout is not a timesaver, but does have a main line and 3 sidings.  2 sidings can hold 2 cars max. and the other 3 cars max.  The mainline will only hold the loco and 2 cars.  We also use small cars like the Hartland mini cars and an Aristo Lil Critter for the motive power.  There are 6 cars on the various sidings when the child starts.  The cars are all numbered.  They then pull 3 cards from a deck of 6 cards.  This tells them the cars they have to pick up and in what order.  So with the mainline lining up with the straight siding that will hold 3 cars it makes it a challenge to clear that track and get the cars in order to have the loco and 3 cars on that track.  We have been using this switching module for over 10 years and it has been a big success with the little ones at the events.  It was originally made for the Boy Scouts Scout-O-Rama and is one requirement for their Railroading Merit Badge. 

       

      Edit:  I wish I had a picture of it.  The next time we have it up, I will take a picture.

    • August 21, 2019 6:50 AM EDT
    • I have always used a transformer with an Aristo TE 27 mhz, for the control.  The transformer can be set to half throttle and that keeps anyone from cranking it all the way up.  

    • August 20, 2019 10:15 AM EDT
    • Well. Greg, I ended up with hunks of styrofoam at the track ends along with wheel stops. That paid off the first time a kid cranked the throttle full before I could react. The styrofoam bumper was held down with double faced tape, and did its job!

       

      [foto to be inserted here]

    • August 19, 2019 8:18 PM EDT
    • Yep, the LGB loco pictured was donated to the club, but I definitely prefer something with skates for this kind of situation.

       

      I screwed the track down at the edges of the sections with 4mm truss head screws, so it will be tough for someone to tear the track off.

       

      All I need now is some wheel stops on the end tracks (TOC uses Ozark ones, epoxied in place) and some way to stow the slide off pieces inside, and some kind of top speed limiter, 7 smph, and a toggle switch built into the top.

       

      Greg

    • August 19, 2019 7:12 PM EDT
    • Pete Lassen said:

      going to bring up building one at next club meeting. I think kids would love a simple puzzle they can operate, either counting moves or timing  a set number of moves and keep a scoreboard with their times. I think it would be great at places where we take our module setups!I like your small reduced one Greg

      We use the lil big hauler stuff on our clubs but running Thomas and the cars in those sets would add interest for kids.

    • August 19, 2019 7:10 PM EDT
    • Our club president made a portable timesaver to take to shows. We let the show goers operate it and once a year we have a switch off competition for our club.

    • August 18, 2019 11:26 AM EDT
    • going to bring up building one at next club meeting. I think kids would love a simple puzzle they can operate, either counting moves or timing  a set number of moves and keep a scoreboard with their times. I think it would be great at places where we take our module setups!I like your small reduced one Greg

    • August 15, 2019 6:24 PM EDT
    • Lou Luczu said:

      I had made mine on an old door, but the door was too long to fit in my truck.

      This is food for thought, especially if I am expected to bring mine to next year's ECLSTS.

       

      That's exactly what I was thinking, Lou. If you need a contribution, let me know.

       

    • August 15, 2019 5:26 PM EDT
    • I had made mine on an old door, but the door was too long to fit in my truck.

      This is food for thought, especially if I am expected to bring mine to next year's ECLSTS.