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    • August 15, 2019 6:42 PM EDT
    • That's beautiful Bob!

       

      Your work reminds me that sometime I'd like to make a load like that for the Union Mine in Virginia City NV. The problem was, it was 40 feet in diameter! And I've not seen any clear photographic or other evidence on how it was split up for shipment. I'll guess it was in 1/8 segments though, and probably with lots of cribbing and tie-downs.

       

      Anyway, great job, and very inspirational! Glad you've gotten this great tool!

      Cliff

       

       

    • August 13, 2019 7:45 PM EDT
    • Bob McCown said:

      Anyway, after a couple test prints of small bits for gaming, I dove into a bigger project, a flatcar load; half of a giant flywheel.

      I have 3 out of the 4 parts printed.   Each bit takes about 4 1/2 hours. 

      Bob, before you glue it up, check the orientation.  I believe the bolt holes would face down as intended to attach the other half.

      -Dan

       

    • August 13, 2019 7:28 PM EDT
    • Norman I would search Thingaverse and Shapeways and I am sure there are others. I know someone 3D printed an HO 4-4-0, but I cant seam to find it in my bookmarks right now

       

    • August 13, 2019 6:47 PM EDT
    •  

      I use Fusion 360 to do all my drawing in.  Then I export it out into the slicer (Qidi Print), which lets me rotate and scale, and add supports.

       

      I guess none of them are "easy" to learn, but I found Fusion 360 less hard than the others.  And all that geometry from school that I never though I'd need comes in handy.  

    • August 13, 2019 1:55 PM EDT
    •  

      Hi Bob,

       

      What Software are you using to Design your 3D Printouts?

       

      If I am going to go through the Mental Effort of learning another Software Package,

      what is the easiest Software Package to learn?

       

      I simply want to print a Cab, Boiler, Domes and Smokebox Front.

       

      Are there Software Packages specifically for Model Railroaders with BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS Parts already Designed ?

       

      Norman

       

       

    • August 13, 2019 11:17 AM EDT
    • Really nice print, Bob. The bolt and rivet detail are great. This will make an interesting flatcar load.

      John R.

       

    • August 13, 2019 8:01 AM EDT
    • Greg Elmassian said:

      Looks like a cool machine, any reason that you got a dual unit, other than the great deal?

       

      The metal frame looks very sturdy:

       

      Dual unit?  It is a single extruder, though they do make a dual that I was eyeing.  And, yea, the steel frame is nice.  Its nice and sturdy, and relatively quiet compared to other ones that I've heard operate. The build plate kind of limits what I can make, though i have plans to make various bits in interlocking pieces.

       

      Next up, probably, will be a test print of the ore chute drawings I got from Cliff.  And I'm going to modify my colliery windows that I had printed a few years ago, to make them sturdier, and print them myself.

       

      Fun!

    • August 13, 2019 7:10 AM EDT
    • Welcome to the wonderful, wacky world of 3d printing.  Some many more projects to add to your list now :-)

       

    • August 12, 2019 8:40 PM EDT
    • Looks like a cool machine, any reason that you got a dual unit, other than the great deal?

       

      The metal frame looks very sturdy:

    • August 12, 2019 7:19 PM EDT
    • Hehe...nice.....Flywheel for the Titanic??  Kinda looks like a bascule bridge crank that you will need for the floats coming out of the harbor !

      I ain't going there yet as I still like my ghetto modeling. It does look good as a load but now you will need a heavier flat!

       

    • August 12, 2019 7:10 PM EDT
    • One of our esteemed members had an extra 3D printer lying around, and made me an offer I couldnt refuse, so I became the proud owner of a Qidi 3d printer.  One of the smaller ones, but big enough for what I want to use it for, I think.

       

      Anyway, after a couple test prints of small bits for gaming, I dove into a bigger project, a flatcar load; half of a giant flywheel.

       

       

       

      I have 3 out of the 4 parts printed.   Each bit takes about 4 1/2 hours. 

    • August 3, 2019 8:54 PM EDT
    • Way to heavy/in depth for me Eric but very cool !  Still like the Amtrash car reader video you did awhile back.

    • August 2, 2019 9:32 PM EDT
    • I think this one that I’m using is the only stationary decoder on the market. They also have a signal decoder.  

    • August 2, 2019 7:03 PM EDT
    • Looks like fun, and recently I have been getting a lot of requests for automation solutions, and I'm looking for a good JMRI-based one, so this looks good.

      Have you seen many LCC stationary decoders yet?

       

      Greg

    • August 2, 2019 4:38 PM EDT
    • I'm not running any track power, so LCC is a perfect solution for controlling everything else.  I hope to add signals down the road.  I will have the electronics either in the house or shed or some waterproof container at various central points, and run the CAN bus between them.  I have conduit to the shed for this purpose.  I'm going to use the same strategy of having 2 or 3 centralized locations and long air hoses.  

       

      I don't see any reason that the CAN bus couldn't be shared, provided that the data rate is the same and the the individual systems use unique message IDs.  One of the great things about LCC is that each node produced has a unique ID and generates unique messages, so there is no danger of overlap if nodes are moved from system to system.  Adding non-LCC components would potentially compromise this, so I'm not sure it's really worth the trouble.

       

      Each solenoid draws about 75 mA, and the LCC power point only supplies 500, so it's not practical to supply power over the bus using standard-compliant hardware.

       

      There really isn't any other LCC hardware at this point.  I'll probably build some of my own, though.  I have a block of addresses assigned to me.

    • August 2, 2019 3:44 PM EDT
    • so, you are battery right? So you will run the CAN bus to the various "areas" where you need to control solenoids? I grouped mine into 3 locations, preferring longer air lines to longer wires and more locations.

       

      Has anyone ever considered sharing the LCC CAN bus with other CAN bus systems? (my Zimo uses the CAN bus).

       

      Nice setup, easy with off the shelf components. I guess there was no way to have enough power from the CAN bus to power the solenoids, so you must run power and the CAN bus to each "group" of solenoids.

       

      Also, did you consider/evaluate any other LCC hardware?

       

      Thanks for sharing,  Greg

    • August 2, 2019 2:17 PM EDT
    • Very impressive.  Where you planning to house the control system?

    • August 2, 2019 2:02 PM EDT
    • I put together a bench test for using panels in JMRI to control Sunset Valley pneumatic switch machines through LCC.  Here's a little video demo:

       

    • August 1, 2019 8:38 PM EDT
    • Dick, would either of the trucks below work?