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    • August 1, 2019 11:29 PM EDT
    • Will you be selling kits, Devon 

    • August 1, 2019 11:11 PM EDT
    • Slab jig version 2.0 is in the works. On the original I used a deep 1/2 wide straight bit. Because it was long it cleared the 3/4" thick bottom "runners" of the jig easily. But being primarily a side cut bit as opposed to a bottom cutting bit and so narrow it required many passes and was pretty rough, requiring a bit of sanding. 

       

      So I bought a bottom cutting surfacing bit that is, if I recall, 7/8ths wide. It's made for a cnc router for this exact purpose, make flat surface cuts. But it is a very shallow bit and at max depth of the router and with as much shank as i dare leave out of the router it just didn't clear the 3/4" runners enough for my liking. 

       

      So I got some scrap L bracket shelving stuff from work. This will replace the 3/4" runners with about 1/16th inch metal. That should give me enough clearance. I also made a plate for the router that fits between the L brackets to guide the router better than I was doing it. I also bought a package of two wood rulers from the dollar store that I will inlay into each side so I can adjust the height off the table without the need to measure with a tape measure. When I get it done I will give you guys a better look at it. 

    • July 31, 2019 12:48 PM EDT
    • Thats a lot fancier but basically the same thing. Never about using it to cut flutes but it would do it. Bonus.

    • July 31, 2019 12:37 PM EDT
    • Devon Sinsley said:

      As for interesting uses for a router I just learned of a new one. So I love making jigs and using tools in unconventional ways. Its kinda its own hobby. Hence the flattening sled. I have made all sorts of sleds and jigs for the table saw and what not. But one cool thing I just learned about and will copy is a jig for the router runs on a tool rest on the lathe. And you use it for the initial truing of a turning blank so that you save on the bearings and tools for your lathe. You can take very uneven out of balance stock chuck it into your lathe and then spin the lathe by hand as you move the router back and forth across the length. taking off a small amount of the high spots at a time. You repeat this until it is relatively round and balanced. Then you can proceed like normal.

      Is this the same setup you use to cut flues on round stock?

      Image result for cutting flutes in colums

    • July 31, 2019 11:25 AM EDT
    • As for interesting uses for a router I just learned of a new one. So I love making jigs and using tools in unconventional ways. Its kinda its own hobby. Hence the flattening sled. I have made all sorts of sleds and jigs for the table saw and what not. But one cool thing I just learned about and will copy is a jig for the router runs on a tool rest on the lathe. And you use it for the initial truing of a turning blank so that you save on the bearings and tools for your lathe. You can take very uneven out of balance stock chuck it into your lathe and then spin the lathe by hand as you move the router back and forth across the length. taking off a small amount of the high spots at a time. You repeat this until it is relatively round and balanced. Then you can proceed like normal.

    • July 31, 2019 11:13 AM EDT
    • Pin routers are cool and I have considered making one. At least what I am thinking of as a pin router. They are the predecessor to a CNC router or a vertical milling machine. The ones I have seen made the router spindle is stationary and you move the work piece under it. The Shopsmith is a perfect platform for this. You can build more or less like a machinist vise that also very precise router cuts. Not only flattening guitar bodies but also cutting the cutout sections of the body for the hardware. Since I own the shopsmith now I have abandon the idea of making a pin router and just using the SS to do vertical milling.

       

    • July 30, 2019 11:41 PM EDT
    • " Rooster " said:
      Jon Radder said:

       Very interesting use of the router.

      Yep !

      And just tonight on TV  I saw an antique Pin Router being used to mill a guitar body.  If you are not familiar with a pin router (I wasn't) it is a large work table with the router spindle above the table on an arm.  Very cool machine.

    • July 30, 2019 7:13 PM EDT
    • Jon Radder said:

       Very interesting use of the router.

      Yep !

    • July 29, 2019 9:18 PM EDT
    • That's right purty!  Very interesting use of the router.

       

      Really glad to hear that you are feeling better and getting back into projects like this.

    • July 29, 2019 7:28 PM EDT
    • Huge fan of "yard trees" especially black walnut myself as it's beautiful wood that tells stories about it's growth. Had some BW slabs given to me (I know the "yard" that they came from along with the history) that I used when I redid my kitchen a few years ago (suspect 100+ yrs old for various reasons and BW can live 200+ yrs) . Ended up using cast iron victorian brackets under them and finished two of the four (spice shelves) with a food grade oil finish so I could wipe them down with oil along with the soapstone counters and sink.

       

      Shelf looks beautiful Dev.

       

      Nice Work!

    • July 29, 2019 3:57 PM EDT
    • Just saw this Dev, and your shelf looks great!!  

      Really love your planer, I might try something like that on a big slice of walnut trunk I salvaged from last year's tree clearing.

    • July 29, 2019 11:40 AM EDT
    • Colin Criswell said:

      Devon,

      Great work from a fellow woodworker and garden railroader.  I save all the lumber I can get free.  I have a lot of hard maple flooring that was left over on one of my projects.  The flooring company was going to through it in the trash, but I said put it in the back of my pickup instead.  I am still making thing from it 10 years later.  Black walnut is a beautiful wood.  I would have done the same.  I too have used the black pipe to make brackets for shelves.  I have used my planner to flatten warped wood before by using a wedge on the two side that needed it.  You use of a router is very ingenious.  I may have to steal your idea in the future.  Happy Railroading and am very happy you are feeling better.  Keep getting better and doing the things that keep you happy. 

      I have used the planner also. I used a piece of 1"MDF and the put my wood on it and wedged it so it stays flat to the bed. It works great and at the end of the day is probably easier than the router method. But I don't have a planner at my house it is at my dads shop and he lives an hour away. And the main reason for this table and router sled is for wider slabs. I want to get into working with bigger slabs and epoxy resin. This allows you to flatten slabs 30" wide and almost 6' long. Its an important part of getting slabs flat and then surfacing the slab after the resin is poured. So It is a good addition to my shop tools. Its not my design by any means. Its my take on a commercial flatten jig made by stone coat countertops. I just purchased a used router and a belt sander at an auction for $10 for the pair. I plan to dedicate one of my routers to this slab jig and a circle jig. And then I want to build a similar sled for the belt sander so I can use it as a thickness sander.

    • July 28, 2019 9:14 PM EDT
    • Devon,

      Great work from a fellow woodworker and garden railroader.  I save all the lumber I can get free.  I have a lot of hard maple flooring that was left over on one of my projects.  The flooring company was going to through it in the trash, but I said put it in the back of my pickup instead.  I am still making thing from it 10 years later.  Black walnut is a beautiful wood.  I would have done the same.  I too have used the black pipe to make brackets for shelves.  I have used my planner to flatten warped wood before by using a wedge on the two side that needed it.  You use of a router is very ingenious.  I may have to steal your idea in the future.  Happy Railroading and am very happy you are feeling better.  Keep getting better and doing the things that keep you happy. 

    • July 28, 2019 9:11 PM EDT
    • Very good work Dev. Glad you are feeling good again. Keep it up.

    • July 28, 2019 12:23 PM EDT
    • Experts, I always listen to their opinion then make up my own mind.

      Someone once told  me that the definition of an ex-spurt is "a has been drip under pressure"

      Beautiful job on the shelf Devon!

    • July 31, 2019 10:45 AM EDT
    • Fred Mills. said:

      Bernie, and I should arrive there on Friday morning, Ric...

            Fred Mills

       

      Noelle and I also shall arrive Friday morning.  Yay Steam!!!!  Rooster doesn't know what he's missing.... Here's cinders in your eye, kids.  Heh, heh! 

    • July 31, 2019 10:45 AM EDT
    • Fred Mills. said:

      Bernie, and I should arrive there on Friday morning, Ric...

            Fred Mills

       

      Noelle and I also shall arrive Friday morning.  Yay Steam!!!!  Rooster doesn't know what he's missing.... Here's cinders in your eye, kids.  Heh, heh! 

    • July 31, 2019 7:21 AM EDT
    • Bernie, and I should arrive there on Friday morning, Ric...

            Fred Mills

    • July 31, 2019 6:40 AM EDT
    • 31 July, 2019 - Finger Lakes Live Steamers, Marengo, New York

      The 50th Anniversary Celebration is officially scheduled to begin tomorrow, 1 August.  However, people started arriving yesterday.  Over 200 people are registered and it should be a fun and busy event.  The facilities are looking good and trains will be running on all 3 gauges.

    • July 29, 2019 6:31 AM EDT
    • " Rooster " said:

      I don't even like steam locomotives

      So you like them newfangled, cantankerous, unproven diesel=lectric thangs. Steam is a proven technology.