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    • December 14, 2019 3:49 PM EST
    • Great video, Noel,  Thanks for sharing.

    • December 14, 2019 12:53 PM EST
    • Thanks Joe Z. for the help on embedding videos again.

      To bad there is not a how to on bottom of Forum page to remember how to do it.  On search I couldn't find anything on it.

       

      Note:  On the video time line 1:58 was not " I don't think it was "  a hi fi to the cop. May have been another hand jester. LoL

       

      We made a add on video to cont. with this video to show upgrades on the layout. It's was for some local trains buds.

       

      https://youtu.be/mTdU5biGDxQ

       

    • December 13, 2019 7:39 PM EST
    • Just post the link, Noel and someone will get the video embedded.  I do want to see it and don't mind following the link.

    • December 13, 2019 4:31 PM EST
    • Our Ho was set up for all kids of all ages. Mainly us old people.  laf.  

      Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all. 

      Noel & Jane 


       

       

    • December 9, 2019 7:18 PM EST
    • Dave Meashey said:

      Having initially cut my model railroading "teeth" on American Flyer S gauge trains (1:64 or 3/16 inch equals a foot), I sometimes had to play a bit more loosely with scale than other folks.  Bachmann Plasticville buildings were a compromise between O and S scale.  At times I had to choose Lionel for a certain kind of bridge or other accessory, so I tended to be less straight-laced than some. 

       

      With the large scale I have been known to run 1:29, 1:24, and 1:22.5 in the same train, so long as the "look" of the combined equipment is not overly outrageous.  That said, there are certain things I will modify because the original model is not "right."  Steam locomotive boilers with only one safety valve are not "right."  Even by the 1860s, most boilers were carrying over 120psi on the gage.  That calls for two safety valves.  Other things will prompt modification:  A wood burning locomotive with a straight, capped stack (BIG No-No  Gotta' have a spark arresting stack).  Engineer figure on a steamer sporting a heavy and long beard (BIG safety hazard.  Sparks kicked from the exhaust could set the beard on fire, plus the beard could catch on the controls).  You get the idea?

       

      Now, where scale really does matter is among the live steam crowd - not proportion scale, but boiler scale.  That is why we use distilled water, and make sure we vent the boiler (or empty it) once things cool down (don't want steam oil sucked into the boiler).  I remember on the three large live steamers that I worked with, blowing down the boiler daily was an important task.  That helped flush much of the boiler scale away.

       

      Anyway, very interesting thread.

       

      Have fun, David Meashey 

       

       

       

      Fair enough and well said !

    • December 8, 2019 4:32 PM EST
    • Having initially cut my model railroading "teeth" on American Flyer S gauge trains (1:64 or 3/16 inch equals a foot), I sometimes had to play a bit more loosely with scale than other folks.  Bachmann Plasticville buildings were a compromise between O and S scale.  At times I had to choose Lionel for a certain kind of bridge or other accessory, so I tended to be less straight-laced than some. 

       

      With the large scale I have been known to run 1:29, 1:24, and 1:22.5 in the same train, so long as the "look" of the combined equipment is not overly outrageous.  That said, there are certain things I will modify because the original model is not "right."  Steam locomotive boilers with only one safety valve are not "right."  Even by the 1860s, most boilers were carrying over 120psi on the gage.  That calls for two safety valves.  Other things will prompt modification:  A wood burning locomotive with a straight, capped stack (BIG No-No  Gotta' have a spark arresting stack).  Engineer figure on a steamer sporting a heavy and long beard (BIG safety hazard.  Sparks kicked from the exhaust could set the beard on fire, plus the beard could catch on the controls).  You get the idea?

       

      Now, where scale really does matter is among the live steam crowd - not proportion scale, but boiler scale.  That is why we use distilled water, and make sure we vent the boiler (or empty it) once things cool down (don't want steam oil sucked into the boiler).  I remember on the three large live steamers that I worked with, blowing down the boiler daily was an important task.  That helped flush much of the boiler scale away.

       

      Anyway, very interesting thread.

       

      Have fun, David Meashey 

       

    • December 8, 2019 10:43 AM EST
    • I wonder how that happened ?

      We got older and our eyesight got worse.  The bigger the better!

       

    • December 8, 2019 3:43 AM EST
    • In the UK, where the 16mm scale is quite established, it is quite common to offer models of "2 ft gauged" prototypes with an option for gauging wheelsets at 45mm as well as what should be the correctly scaled 32 mm ones. That does not mean the 45 mm gauged models of 2 ft gauged prototypes have suddenly rescaled themselves to 7/8ths by that action  This is more a convention to offer the maximum sales potential as there are probably many more modellers operating on 45 mm tracks than 32 mm in the UK and elsewhere. And anyhow, a lot of the product listed as 16mm scale never ran on 2ft gauge but some other increment between there and 3ft, or even below. A 2'6" gauged prototype, if scaled at 16mm will be riding about right on 45mm track.

       

      So my 16mm scaled, so the manufacturers tell me, Welshpool & Llanfair stock are running seemingly in a prototypical manner on my line. Now I have all I have to fix is the rail height, the less than prototypical LGB inspired code 332  What to do about the Lynton & barnstaple items I run though ? They are supposed to run on 1'11.5" gauged track in real life. A scale and gauge nightmare to the purist.

       

      Just to make matters even more confusing, for some, there is also a thriving market in the UK now for "true" 7/8ths scaled models that run on 45mm gauge track. Not just body conversions of nominally 16 mm scaled "freelance" locos. Still with the usual caveats about the actual gauge of the prototypes depicted. I wonder how that happened ? 

    • December 7, 2019 1:25 PM EST
    • Yea, they got a couple of prairie's out there that are great looking think 1 with a tender and 2 saddle tankers + a 2-6-6-2 saddle tanker that looks like the Bachmann one

      saddle tanker

    • December 7, 2019 12:54 PM EST
    • Actually the Bachman Connie was modeled on a Mexican 30" gauge locomotive, currently at Black Hills Central out of Service (converted to 36" gauge) and was once at Edaivile in Carver Massachusetts.

    • December 7, 2019 9:01 AM EST
    • Pete Thornton said:
      Bill Barnwell said:

      Interesting, but found that some of it's parts are shared by Bachmann's Connie which is suppose to be 7/8

      I don't think so.  It's a 1:20.3 model loosely based on a 2' gauge ouside-frame loco.  Yes, rubber ruler, but not 7/8ths.

       

      The One20point3 group is alive and well.  It just moved to groups.io due to the demise of Yahoo groups.
      https://groups.io/g/One20point3

       

      There are 2 active Facebook groups that I know of, but as you hate them I won't tell you any more.

       

       

      sorry I meant 1:20.3 not 7/8

       

    • December 6, 2019 10:00 PM EST
    • Pete:

       

      Thanks for the link, though I wouldn't exactly call them "active" or perhaps I am misreading it.

       

      I'm aware of the FB groups, but yes, I do hate FB for forum type of information.

       

      Hoping that Bill responds with a more traditional forum type link.

       

      Thanks again, Mark

       

    • December 6, 2019 7:59 PM EST
    •  

       

       

      Once again ....scale matters not!

    • December 6, 2019 7:19 PM EST
    • Bill Barnwell said:

      Interesting, but found that some of it's parts are shared by Bachmann's Connie which is suppose to be 7/8

      I don't think so.  It's a 1:20.3 model loosely based on a 2' gauge ouside-frame loco.  Yes, rubber ruler, but not 7/8ths.

       

      The One20point3 group is alive and well.  It just moved to groups.io due to the demise of Yahoo groups.
      https://groups.io/g/One20point3

       

      There are 2 active Facebook groups that I know of, but as you hate them I won't tell you any more.

    • December 6, 2019 6:48 PM EST
    • Bill:

       

      I would appreciate it if you could share which F scale forum(s) that you would post this question on.  Other than Facebook (I hate FB) I have not been successful in locating such a forum that is reasonably active. 

       

      Thanks. 

    • December 6, 2019 5:36 PM EST
    • I agree, but I was thinking of posting something on f scale forum, and they are so picky and get piss off if it isn't 1/20th, think I'll just pass, I'm not a rivet counter

    • December 6, 2019 5:20 PM EST
    • Nobody ever accused Bachmann (among others) of using the rubber ruler.  

       

      The usual "if it looks good to you" or "from 10ft away" may apply, it does for me.

    • December 6, 2019 4:28 PM EST
    • Interesting, but found that some of it's parts are shared by Bachmann's Connie which is suppose to be 7/8

    • December 6, 2019 3:09 PM EST
    • It's a decent 1:22.5 scale model of the ET&WNC 4-6-0 #123 that is still operating.

       

       

       

    • December 7, 2019 11:04 PM EST
    • Interesting. Just saw yet another article about this and it mentions other rock stars that are into trains [link]:

       

      ”But Stewart isn't the only rock star who dabbles in model trains. The Who's Roger Daltrey [link], Phil Collins, Neil Young [link], The Rolling Stones' Ronnie Wood, and pianist Jools Holland [link] also share in the hobby.”

       

      Here's one of the pictures from that article that I hadn't seen anywhere else:

       

       

      And here's one of Jools Holland:

       

       

       

      There's also a wikipedia article [link] listing a bunch of other celebrities, including Tom Hanks, Elton John, Joe DiMaggio, Frank Sinatra, Bruce Springstein, and, amazingly enough, Hermann Göring (of Nazi fame).

       

      [edited to add a wikipedia article, the Rod Stewart picture, links to articles/videos for other rocker's railroads, and a pic for Jools Holland's railroad]