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    • July 11, 2020 1:30 PM EDT
    • Years ago I purchased a guys layout up in the foxboro area of MA. I bought about 600’ of Aristo SS track, switches, some really nicely made buildings, and one consist of cars with a Climax. The gentleman had weathered the cars and scratch built a work car out of one of the flats. All have very nice detail with smaller metal wheels except the caboose which has larger wheels and different trucks. All have body mounted couplers that look like Bachmann but there is no markings on the cars that I can find.i got the whole consist fairly cheap as the climax had issues and I could tell the gentleman wasn’t very satisfied with it yet he had other Spektrum locos that he wouldn’t sell and was going to leave them on his shelves. I’ve owned these for well over 10+ years and about 18months ago ordered two new motor blocks for the climax and finally got to fixing it. Turned out he had replaced the rear motor block already so for now I just did the front. It’s running perfectly as of right now. This cars I had never run around my indoor just because so with the climax fixed I decided to clean them up some and run them. That’s when I realized just how nice and detailed they are. The scale of these cars seems to be smaller also but possibly they were done that way to simulate narrow gauge better? Any ideas?

    • July 11, 2020 12:02 PM EDT
    • If the boards line up, what is the probability of interference as trucks swing on curves?

      If there is interference, what's the probability of me chopping a bit off the end?

       

      I did decide to improve the alignment, so I gently removed the boards with a flat knife and bent the supports up. Having the pins in place helped a lot. Then I made another jig and bent them down again and glued the boards back on..

       

       

      That looks better. We will see if any chopping is necessary. (The lighting makes the gaps look different.)

       

    • July 11, 2020 11:37 AM EDT
    • Pete,

      That is some awesome work, thanks for sharing your efforts.

      George

    • July 11, 2020 7:10 AM EDT
    • Pete Thornton said:

      And here's the result after the glue dries.  They don't seem to line up perfectly! Maybe I'll have to do something about it, or maybe not. Shouldn't bee too difficult to raise the center boards.

       

       

      If the boards line up, what is the probability of interference as trucks swing on curves?

    • July 10, 2020 4:54 PM EDT
    • nice detailing Pete

    • July 10, 2020 2:03 PM EDT
    • On to the guards lookout (duckett) that is going to fit by the Guard's door. Unfortunately it is sized for the end of a Thomas coach, where there is a thin panel. I could just glue it to the coach side and hope no-one will notice, but I didn't like the long top panel that dives under it. I chopped 2 pieces off a plastic tube and cut them down to almost fit in the panel, and thus after gluing, to make a new end.

       

       

      The center panel is too short, so I filled the edge of it to fit the duckett with Testors contour putty. Certainly going to look better than just leaving it alone.

       

    • July 10, 2020 1:48 PM EDT
    • And we're back . .   I resolved to get this done as there isn't much to do besides paint.  Add footboards, attach ducketts and battery boxes, and clean the windows.

      The battery boxes needed a bit of trimming and the truss rods needed adjusting. (The blue painters tape is marked with the positions of the center of the frame, and where the rods fit.)

       

       

      As the boxes are hanging down, I decided they needed proper support - i.e. a screw.  (The pieces of rail is actually the frame reinforcement along the center.)

       

       

      These coaches have a long "footboard" as there is no corridor inside. In an emergency, the passengers may be required to get out through the compartment doors.  I had some basswood and a long strip of 1/32" x 3/32" brass so I made a little jig for bending so the 8 pieces would be close to the same size.

       

       

      I also decided that the footboards needed some positive reinforcement, so the top was drilled #74 for some 1/2" pins that I have.

       

       

      Here's the footboard support with a pin and glue, and a metal rod lying on top while the glue dries. The pin on the right needs replacing.

       

       

      With everything the right way up, I tried the footboard strip.

       

       

      Looks OK, so out with the glue (gorilla, clear,) and some clamps.  While that was setting, I made some similar supports for the footboards on the trucks. Glue and a pin and clamps, again.

       

       

      Unfortunately, as you can see, the supports are far too short. As soon as I picked it up, the boards fell off! So longer ones were fabricated (bottom left.)

       

       

      That's better. It did occur to me that getting the wheels out might be tricky.

       

       

      And here's the result after the glue dries.  They don't seem to line up perfectly! Maybe I'll have to do something about it, or maybe not. Shouldn't bee too difficult to raise the center boards.

       

       

    • July 10, 2020 10:32 PM EDT
    • I'm a true modeler and mutilation is what I do, need I say more. Good modeling skills for me started back in the 1950's putting AMT and Monogram car models together, I haven't stopped model building since then and it took many years to perfect perfection in modeling. So it's never too late to start putting your skills to work, you might just be starting a new part of the hobby that you have passed on for many years. I find in rebuilding any model I pretty much have figured it out before I even start on a new project, it's just something you learn in time and yes I still make many mistakes and have to start over again, it will always be a learning process. 

       

      trainman

    • July 9, 2020 9:32 PM EDT
    • Due to the fact that most of us on these forums, may think of ourselves as "MODEL RAILROADERS", we should not look at the action of converting couplers from truck mounted to body mounted, an impossible task, or that making modest changes to a piece of rolling stock to accommodate body mounted couplers, as "Mutilation".

          The learning of new skills is part of the hobby, and can become most enjoyable, and doing some research, finding out how others accomplish tasks is part of the fun.  Anyone can learn how to modify equipment, and improve performance of their equipment.  All it takes is patience, motivation, and the will to learn, with an open mind.

        Yes, in my somewhat limited experience over 30 years or so; I've learned that in most any task, we can find hard ways of doing things, and also, oh so often, rather simple ways too.

        One of my driving forces, when body mounting couplers, is to improve operations, but another is to get rid of the unsightly "Offset SHANK COUPLER", which is in most cases so unprototypical, and just sticks in my "Craw"....!!!!

        Fred Mills

    • July 9, 2020 6:01 PM EDT
    •       I have never seen a real train with truck  mounted couplers .   They don't back up well through switches. Body mounts are worth the trouble if you plan to operate .  They can be a challenge to install. 

    • July 9, 2020 12:28 PM EDT
    • Eric Mueller said:

      John,

       

      Clever way to mount the battery box!  I've been dickering with internal lights on some of our own cars.  This bears some investigation!

       

      Aloha,

      Eric

      Eric, it was really easy and the LGB Passenger cars have a spot that the battery box fit in just perfect. I don't know about other brands of Passenger cars, but the LGB passenger cars only have two truss rods and they are on the outside part of the under body which gives the battery box room for placement. My cabooses have four truss rods and will make placement of the battery box somewhat difficult without cutting the truss rod away which I wouldn't want to do. I used 3mm LED's for both car lighting and the marker lamps, they came with a resistor and were setup for a 9v battery use. I also added another resistor a 100 ohm and it even lowered the brightness of the lights much more, I think the lighting is pretty close to what the brightness should be. Running the wires inside the car is probably the most time consuming part of the insulation, this just depends on how much you want to hide them in the car. If you need to ask anything about the install, just ask. These are the LED's I used,  https://www.ebay.com/itm/20-x-Pre-wired-9v-3mm-Warm-Soft-White-LEDs-Prewired-9-volt-DC-LED-Light-8v-7v/161606954180?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2648

      trainman

    • July 9, 2020 1:26 AM EDT
    • John,

       

      Clever way to mount the battery box!  I've been dickering with internal lights on some of our own cars.  This bears some investigation!

       

      Aloha,

      Eric

    • July 8, 2020 7:26 PM EDT
    • John Lenheiser said:
      Fred Mills. said:

      Why, oh, why are there two threads on this subject...both the same ?

      Because I tried to post pics under the original topic as I said I would when I finished this car, but for some reason the system would not give me the option to post pics in the original post, so I started a new one so I could post the pics. Maybe it was just me and I just couldn't get it to work in the original post, now you know the reason. If this is offensive to some then the forum moderator can correct this, or remove it, which ever they desire to do.

       

      trainman

      Or as has been the policy here, you can request Bob to remove the offending post(s). It's our laissez faire policy... Only OP can request a removal.

    • July 8, 2020 6:00 PM EDT
    • Fred Mills. said:

      Why, oh, why are there two threads on this subject...both the same ?

      Just checkin to see if the Forum Police were awake..................

    • July 8, 2020 3:04 PM EDT
    • Nice work!  Thank you for sharing.

    • July 8, 2020 10:06 AM EDT
    • Well done, John

    • July 7, 2020 11:44 PM EDT
    • Fred Mills. said:

      Why, oh, why are there two threads on this subject...both the same ?

      Because I tried to post pics under the original topic as I said I would when I finished this car, but for some reason the system would not give me the option to post pics in the original post, so I started a new one so I could post the pics. Maybe it was just me and I just couldn't get it to work in the original post, now you know the reason. If this is offensive to some then the forum moderator can correct this, or remove it, which ever they desire to do.

       

      trainman

    • July 7, 2020 9:20 PM EDT
    • Why, oh, why are there two threads on this subject...both the same ?

    • July 7, 2020 8:48 PM EDT
    • Checkerboard and modified lamps were neat ideas. Cabooses often did have toolboxes underneath.

    • July 7, 2020 12:17 PM EDT
    • Here are some pics of my latest Rust-Oleum 2X paint jobs. The LGB 4075 was purchased used on eBay for $55.00 used, but I would say in just about new condition, which is the way I purchase most of my re-dues. I repainted this car in Rust-Oleum Gloss Kona a dark brown color with just a touch of red in it, I think it makes a good RR color for many rolling stock cars, etc., the car was dull coated after the decals were installed.  I did a lot of extra painting, plus put some stuff in the cargo area and even a checker board on the table in the lounge area, will add some figures when I find what I want, I guess cowboys for the Drover Caboose. I used USA Trains marker lamps and cut them down a little to look more to scale and put LED'S in them as well as the car lighting. I also added a 9v battery box under the car, the box comes with a on/off switch on it and now no need to remove the roof to change batteries, etc., as my RR engines, etc.,will be all battery powered and no power to the track. I think the battery box under the car looks like it goes there and could be water tank, etc. Pics included below.

      trainman