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    • July 29, 2021 5:10 PM EDT
    • Nice builds all.

      As a 17 year member of the Early Rail Yahoo now GroupsIO group I totally approve of the backdated trucks effort!

    • July 29, 2021 1:24 PM EDT
    • Nice job. I suspect the cheap freights in the Xmas train sets from New Bright or Eztec might also look good with proper trucks.

      those trucks it sits on are LGB 67300 frames, which are typically seen underneath Lehmann's Barmer Mountain 3061/0 coaches.

      The trucks do indeed look very 1870s.

      Bachmann also makes smaller wheelsets (25mm) and they currently sell their short trucks off the short (20') freights with wheels for $8.65, which is a steal.  20' Complete Truck (G Universal)  I'd buy some more except I got 4 pairs of similar metal trucks with a Gilpin kit.

      X

    • July 29, 2021 11:34 AM EDT
    • Nick;

       

      Those are a nice pair of box cars.  Changing a car to a four axle car really enhances its appearance.  I put trucks under an LGB Toy Train bobber caboose, and it looked more "business like."

       

      My Tin Cup car started as an Aristo 20 foot car.

       

      This car is scratch built, but I included it to show that New Bright passenger trucks can also work.

       

      Of course, there are some cars that would look silly with bogie trucks.

      Best wishes, David Meashey

    • July 29, 2021 10:16 AM EDT
    • Nice work.

      I have turned several LGB 2 axle Bobbers into 4 axle models before LGB started making them.

    • July 29, 2021 6:48 AM EDT
    • Nice.  I like the trucks. 

    • July 28, 2021 9:22 PM EDT
    • Greetings forumgoers and friends, as of late I have found both inspiration and (somehow) motivation to complete various hobby projects that have sat on backburners at various heat and priority settings. I hereby present to you the newest member of my freight car roster, being an Aristocraft boxcar that I converted from yet another of their starter-set 2-axle bobber-chassis thingies, into something a bit more respectable and 4-axled.

      There's a couple of aspects to this build, with it taking about two months to build thanks to various life events and distractions, (with one in particular being a week spent in the Black Hills of South Dakota) as well as it being inspired by an errant eBay listing I found and did not buy. Somebody somewhere threw together a funky bash of one of these little Aristo boxcars onto an interesting set of trucks, and even gave it interior lighting, for mysterious purposes.

      I liked the general proportions as a shorter but not-quite-pipsqueak car on bogie trucks, but not necessarily those toolboxes hanging out below the doors. With later research, those trucks it sits on are LGB 67300 frames, which are typically seen underneath Lehmann's Barmer Mountain 3061/0 coaches.

      Why coach trucks on a freight car? To my dysfunctional eyeballs and per the contemplation of other hobby friends, the general appearance of these trucks evoke the feeling of 1860/70s freight car bogies, and to be frank, they're far more interesting than the ever-common archbars anyway. Since I model a broad period of secondhand equipment existing between 1880 and 1910, there's no reason some little old boxcars couldn't have wound up somewhere still on old post-civil war trucks, maybe just a spare few weeks or months before being refitted with improved equipment anyway.

      Another excuse is that a lot of my roster equipment lives in a dimension of colonial-export, where various combinations of equipment built by various nationalities can-and-did end up together abroad. Since the trucks are of European design anyway, somebody stuffed them under an imported USA-outline boxcar for whatever reason.

      In any case, after mental preparation, I purchased the candidate for rebuild, being this Pennsy 2-axle boxcar, for a tidy and affordable sum.

      This little guy must have spent a life on siding, with one door open, in a lot of sunshine. Its paint may be faded, but its future is bright!

      Right away the first things to go are the bobber-caboose chassis components. Those corner steps ended up on a locomotive tender project some of you may have read about recently, and the rest was cut apart and binned. I then ordered those trucks and the usual compliment of 31mm Bachmann metal wheels, and denuded the boxcar of most of its removable details. With the trucks arriving, I plopped the body onto them for creative mind-fueling, and again liked what I saw. Necessary surgery involved chopping off the factory coupler mounting blocks, since the couplers will be truck-mounted anyway.

      The immediate issue to arise of course, going from rigid frame mounted axle to pivoting bogies, is how to mount the trucks onto a pivot point on a chassis plate that has none. Metal hardware of course, is the natural answer. Sourcing long length screws and various washers, I spotted and drilled holes that line up with the molded brace-ends on the body, and then drilled holes into two wood blocks, and adhered the blocks with superglue after a thorough tightening.

      Later on, I purchased a set of stirrup footsteps of yet-unknown fabrication, and fitted and glued them onto the chassis' corners.

      Naturally, seeing this you ask, 'how do the trucks fare with going around turns?'

      Considering that's at full twist, tighter than R1, I would say they'll be alright with rotational clearance.

      Different views of the body sitting on the trucks. No truss rods here!

      After a finalized mounting of hardware, I tested the car on the R3 curvature of my indoor layout, and the boxcar rolled around just fine. I then elected to contact the paint department after various delays.

      One thing of note is that I have kept distance from cliche Red boxcars for most of my life as a model railroader. Only one locomotive and one little tank car on my roster are donned in crimson, and due to such color rarity, I found myself deciding to paint this little boxcar as such for variety. I later realized that I should have maybe found an ATSF-lettered boxcar, seeing as this is now the second time I have wiped out Pennsy brown and lettering.

      Black roof, and red body, and smothered lettering.

      And a new brake wheel!

      Speaking of lettering, a friend of mine joked about how only a fraction of stenciled data marks survives on my paintings and builds. They mentioned something about PR 225 being all that would remain and some such, so I elected to recover those letters and numbers to immortalize such remarks. Anonymity rules on my railways.

      Before the reclamation, I weathered all of the black parts of the boxcar, which coincidentally included a second set of those masquerading coach trucks. I liked the look so much that I made an executive order to get and fit another pair to another boxcar of mine.

      This old green guy is a 1980s Kalamazoo boxcar that previously sat on archbars.

      Now it looks positively 1870s! Easy retrofits bring forth good mojo.

      A bunch of paint slathering later, first with paintbrushes and then with a recoat of the sprayed red to mute the weathering washes. Coming along nicely.

      Readable reporting marks are overrated. The day after all the paintwork I sealed the deal with the usual blasts of Krylon Matte to murder the shinies, and a day later of that curing, final reassembly occurred, followed by test runs behind my 1880s Dunkirk beastie, to stretch the engine's legs after a long period of sitting, and to test the overall performance of the boxcar in a consist.

      Success was had, with no clearance issues after fitting in large plastic washers onto the screw kingpins. No wobbles either!

      A photography session later in lovely lower light of a sunset evening, and boxcar #255 looks pretty good. Far improved from sitting on a clunky caboose chassis, and an overall curiosity as a shorter-than-usual length boxcar among my other 4-axle 25-30ft freight cars.

      Thanks for reading!

    • July 29, 2021 11:11 AM EDT
    • USA Trains seems to slap Colorado & Southern on lots of its 1/29th stock - and although I appreciate it is actually the same size as a Bachmann Big Hauler boxcar, the details are smaller and I think the 1:22.5 stuff is more realistic, and probably less expensive.

      After some casual research (if anyone cares) I am starting to understand that the Colorado & Southern was a huge Class 1 (std gauge) carrier from 1898 to 1908, with a few narrow gauge subsidiaries. 

       

       

      From Wikipedia:  The narrow gauge had four distinct lines: the Platte Canyon Line from Denver, Colorado to Como, Colorado, the Gunnison Line from Como to Gunnison, Colorado via Alpine Tunnel, Highline between Como and Leadville, Colorado, and the Clear Creek line from Denver to Silver Plume, Colorado.

      Also from wikipedia: The Denver, South Park, and Pacific Railroad (later called the Denver, Leadville and Gunnison Railway) . . .

      No wonder I am confused by all the 1/29th C&S boxcars!

    • July 27, 2021 4:52 PM EDT
    • Looks great !

    • July 26, 2021 4:17 PM EDT
    • I just found this nice little Aster C&S Mogul #22 in an estate sale. (Don't know why they always seem to end up in my lap.)

       

       

       

      It's the same prototype as the ubiquitous LGB 2-6-0, but this looks a lot different, being made from metal by Aster, and also as a live steamer.
      When visiting a steam-up, it is always good to have a small train - 2 or 3 freights and a caboose, or 2 or 3 coaches.

       

       

      The loco is 1:20.3, so it would be dwarfed by proper 1:20.3 (Fn3) rolling stock. I would think this is an opportunity to acquire some (cheap) LGB or Bachmann or similar stock.  What I am finding is that there are lots of freight cars labelled Colorado & Southern, but very few are realistic. USA Trains seems to slap Colorado & Southern on lots of its 1/29th stock - and although I appreciate it is actually the same size as a Bachmann Big Hauler boxcar, the details are smaller and I think the 1:22.5 stuff is more realistic, and probably less expensive.

       

      Coaches, on the other hand, while there are plenty in 1:22.5, they are all shrunk from prototype size. I'm familiar with the LGB coaches, which seem to be similar to Bachmann but maybe not so short? And the Piko ones seem even shorter.

       

      I guess what started it was my LGB-derived Mason/Mogul, which looks good with a few LGB+Bachmann freights.

       

       

      I also found some DSP&PRR coaches on Jack's shelves.

       

       

      (That last one should have been in the "Spring Photos" thread?)

       

      So what does anyone suggest?  Are Colorado & Southern (authentic) freight cars freely available? How about coaches?

       

    • July 24, 2021 7:32 PM EDT
    • Done.  Back to work on the GP38-2.

       

       

    • July 23, 2021 9:13 AM EDT
    • Snott bad ...

    • July 22, 2021 6:56 PM EDT
    • I picked up five used BethGons in need of a rescue.

       

       

       

       

      First one is complete.

       

       

    • July 9, 2021 9:40 PM EDT
    • Proof of the Pudding...

      On June 26th I was trying to run the three streamliners behind the FA/FB for open house the following day.  For the life of me, even spending well over an hour "adjusting" track, I could not get the consist to reliably run a single lap without the stramliners derailing in one place of another.  

       

      Today, with no track changes since June 26th, other than regular watering, deterioration, and settling, I put the trio behind my battery/track powered FA so I could try them out without much effort.  I figured they would probably still have some problems to address as prototypes often do.

       

      NOPE!!!  The FA pulled them through the loop, lap after lap, without a single derailment!    Was even better than I could have hoped for, though they do swing a hair wider and I did move a rock a fraction of an inch for clearance!

       

      It will be nice to be able to run them after all these years.

    • July 8, 2021 10:03 PM EDT
    • Done.  Will have to try to get in some testing this weekend.

    • July 7, 2021 8:42 PM EDT
    •  

       

      One down and two to go.

       

       

      Still clears the rails.

      Stock.  Note that the bottom of the air tank is at the bottom of the brake assembly.

       

      Modified.  Note the bottom of the air tank is well below the bottom of the brake assembly.

       

    • July 7, 2021 4:05 PM EDT
    • Todd Brody said:
      Bruce Chandler said:

      It seems logical, but I have changed my views on logic after dealing with a water feature!  (I USED to think that water would NEVER flow uphill!)

       

      I have water that flows uphill through "wicking."  It does this under my waterfall that the trains pass behind and drips on the track.  I had to epoxy an "L" bracket as a dam under the waterfall to stop this problem.

      Well, if you define "wicking" as flowing in the most illogical direction that will baffle you the most, then I agree.  (Just remember I USED to think that water always flowed "downhill" - silly me)

    • July 7, 2021 3:31 PM EDT
    • Bruce Chandler said:

      It seems logical, but I have changed my views on logic after dealing with a water feature!  (I USED to think that water would NEVER flow uphill!)

       

      I have water that flows uphill through "wicking."  It does this under my waterfall that the trains pass behind and drips on the track.  I had to epoxy an "L" bracket as a dam under the waterfall to stop this problem.

    • July 7, 2021 3:27 PM EDT
    • It seems logical, but I have changed my views on logic after dealing with a water feature!  (I USED to think that water would NEVER flow uphill!)

    • July 7, 2021 3:16 PM EDT
    • Won't know until I get screws and wire them up.  The one truck is only sitting in place to show the difference.

       

      But, it addresses the five primary flaws:

       

      1) It lets the car now rock side to side,

       

      2) It lowers the center of gravity both at the car due to a lower body, but also below the trucks from the metal bolt/nut combination and heavier materials,

       

      3) It addresses the issue of unbalanced torque about the centerline of rotation.  This may not be an issue with body mount couplers.  But on truck mounted couplers (like I use), as the cars go through a turn, the tangs are forced outwards which forces the inner axles inwards by a greater amount potentially adding to derailments.

       

      4) They are much stronger than the plastic originals which are prone to crack at the mounting towers, like several of mine have done.

       

      5) Improves the looks by reducing the gap at the trucks. 

       

      Can't really see how they can't help.

       

      BTW, if anyone wants to duplicate what I've done because you have access to a laser cutter or 3D printer, you are welcome to the .dwg files.

    • July 7, 2021 2:36 PM EDT
    • Looks good!  

       

      Did that fix the tracking issue?