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    • December 7, 2019 2:22 AM EST
    • So over on my thread about PVC sheets, Greg asked me to post a few pictures of the project that I needed such a large sheet for. I've never really shared this project as it's half completed, and frankly not that interesting at the moment. This first post will cover the background of the building, why I'm modeling it, etc. The next post will cover the general modeling, and I'll see how far it goes now that I'm back into thinking about this model.

       

      T&D Feeds

      My modeling focus is the two communities of Redmond, Wa and Issaquah, Wa. These two towns will serve as the basis for layout that I'm modeling. T&D or T-D Feeds (depending on the source) was one of the three industries that saw regular rail service. T&D Feeds was last served by rail in 2000, and the structure was torn down by 2001.

       

      Historical Background

      A little history lesson. The area I will be modeling is located on the Eastside of Seattle, Washington. The railroad territory has a complicated and storied history. I'll get a longer history written up but for now here's the basics. The first railroad was the Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern, in the late 19th Century. This was quickly purchased by the Northern Pacific. In 1970 the Northern Pacific, Great Northern, CB&Q all merged to create the Burlington Northern. In 1995 Burlington Northern merged with AT&SF to create the BNSF Railway. The BNSF railway sold the line to King County in the early 2000's, who then sold it to the Port of Seattle, and now a shortline railroad operates parts of the line (that whole saga could be a book!). Like any good branch line it used to have a lot of traffic but as the years went by and the BN (and BNSF) ran off customers the branch slowly died. I'm modeling the portion from Woodinville to North Bend. However, by the mid 1970's the line was cut in Issaquah due to the construction of I-90. North Bend at the time was still served by rail, via a connection on the Milwaukee Railroad. Because I don't have acres and acres of land to model the whole subdivison, I narrowed my focus to Redmond and Issaquah because these are the two areas that I frequently visited as a kid. I grew up in Redmond, so the area is very familiar to me.

       

      Redmond had the following industries;

      Sea Freeze Frozen Foods (I think they received and shipped out frozen fish, but I'm not 100% sure yet). Rail service was very erratic. Maybe 1 or 2 cars a month or even less. I still haven't found evidence of a car spotted here. Will eventually be modeled.

      Lumber Supply Facility (shared the same spur as Sea Freeze). They received centerbeam flats and boxcars full of lumber and building supplies. They had service up to three times a week. Still working on researching this facility as well. Will eventually be modeled.

      T&D Feeds was a local feed company that produced custom feed blends for the surrounding farm community. They saw service three times a week, loads in, empties out.

       

      Issaquah had the following industry;

      Darigold. Darigold is a local company that sells dairy products. Before the rail service was cut Darigold shipped out cheese and butter. Will eventually be modeled.

       

       

      Back to T&D Feeds....

       

      By the time I decided I wanted to model T&D Feeds, the structure had been torn down, and the lot was a huge hole in the ground. I knew that I couldn't build a model unless I could develop a decent set of blueprints in which to base the construction of the model from. I first turned to the usual sources of information online and quickly saved as many photos as I could find. I also the the site to take photos of the track knowing that someday the rails would be torn up (I was right).

       

      Part of the complex was across the street and hadn't been torn down, so I took plenty of photos of the cinderblock construction.

      This building is a simply 30' x 30' structure. But in a trapezoid shape. Since I had the measurements and plenty of good photos, I tackled the construction of this building first.

      I learned to cast resin, and made a series of wall panels that interconnected.

      This structure like the rest was intended to be modeled full size. I don't like selective compression, and I wanted the feeling of the building overpowering the trains.

       

      Sadly, this building no longer exists as I no longer plan to model this section of the feed mill. Also, I would likely redo the model anyway if I was to model it as the modeling skills at the time where very crude...

       

       

      Back to the main structure.

       

      With that 'easy' structure done, and having completely exhausted my research skills at the time, I began to wonder if I would ever be able to construct the building. I did a little digging and found out that the State of Washington keeps archival tax records on properties. These archival tax records often include photos and a basic building footprint. Armed with nothing more than a parcel tax id number, I reached out the archives. Thankfully, I also included the adjacent tax parcels just in case. A few weeks later, I got a huge stack of papers in the mail. This was the beginning of the treasure trove of information. Not only was there a building footprint but I also had some historical photos, and some background on the history of the building. I could see what sections of the building where first build (1904) followed by the 1920's addition, followed by the 1940's addition, all the way up the final product in early 2000. The tax parcel information included a description of building construction, wall lengths, etc.

      These are just some of the photos. About the same time, I contacted the Redmond Historical Society and asked them about any information they might have about T&D Feeds. I ended up in email contact with one of the last employees to work there. He provided me with even more photos. Sadly, I lost all my email correspondence with Tom after my school email suddenly stopped working one without warning. Thankfully I had saved the photos, but the more valuable information was in the email threads about grain mixtures, types of products they made, etc.

       

      Also around this time, I looked up Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps for Redmond to glean additional information. Pretty soon I felt that I had enough information to build a model, but how was I going to replicate all those interesting structures on the feed mill? I only had the basic information; 160'x 170 and the wall height of the 1st story. I discovered that Sketchup had a photo matching feature that allowed you to build a 3D model based on photos. You could insert a photo into the model and then draw a measured line based on the perspective of the photo. So I had to teach myself Sketchup... That was a process. In the end, my 3D drawing scaled out to 161' x 169', just about the same size as I had expected. So I resized the building to match the 160 x 170 dimension, and tweaked a few things (I knew a wall wouldn't be 11' 9" but it probably was a even 12'. 

       

      Now I had a master drawing (and I still have the filed saved somewhere). The more I got into this project, the more I vested time and energy. Then one day I was talking to a family friend about my modeling projects and happened to mention this feed mill. He immediately says to me, "I think I have a photo or two of the building. I recall testing out a new camera in the mid 80's." A few days later, I had his slides, so I made a few copies.

       

      Things kept getting more and more interesting....

       

      The more I did research, the more I would stumble upon little nuggets of information. I once found (and promptly saved) a Public Board Award for railroad employees caught in a grain stealing scandal. The owner of T&D Feeds also was a co-owner of another mill worked by the same local. The crew started off gleaning grain from the Snohomish mill, and taking it to T&D Feeds. Eventually, they ended up 'gleaning' whole rail cars full of grain. The Public Board Award listed a few car numbers as well. So with that, plus the information from Tom, the Feed Mill employee, I had a rough outline of how many cars they go per week, what type of grain hoppers, etc. 

       

      Then, I found another modeler in this area that was planning on modeling T&D Feeds as well. He and I exchanged emails, and he shared with me a bunch of his photos of the structure, including some detail shots of the feed truck that was used to deliver feed. 

       

      Anyway's that's the background of the model. Maybe later, I will post some construction photos if people are interested.

    • December 6, 2019 10:42 PM EST
    • A bit of progress on this today on a number of fronts: cable on drum, start of roof, and getting some of the details going.

       

      Cable on drum:

       

       

      Start of roof (the "rafters" are just sitting in place while I figure out where the steam engine sits):

       

       

      Miscellaneous details:

       

       

    • December 6, 2019 5:25 PM EST
    • Cliff Jennings said:

       

      Forrest, I've asked the V&T group, and all I got is that the passenger car & cab roofs were covered with thin sheet metal, which was painted. A prominent historian is Mike Collins (former curator at CSRM, and highly knowledgeable of the V&T), and he says the paint color varied, with gray (on V&T coach #16) being an example. 

       

      So we're not limited to tar / black, which is good to know. If one wanted to stick with colors of typical asbestos fireproof roofing paint of the day, this page by the Pacific Narrow Gauge group is a great resource.  


       

      Yes, I saw that you did; :D have been in V&Tmodelers1869, and Virginia and Truckee, since November 2003 for at least one & since 2010 for the other, while they were still on Yahoo.
      Used to also be in Early Rail Yahoo Group but with my health declining a bit further in last couple years I have dropped out of several of the various hobby groups and forums and stopped Early Rail when they moved to Groups IO but I kept the V&T memberships.

    • December 6, 2019 3:55 PM EST
    • Forrest Scott Wood said:

       

      Hey Cliff, if I might go off on a V&T tangent momentarily;

      the right side of those images brings up V&T question which I've not yet found the answer to. Knowing that B&W photography records reflectance of surfaces as much as, and sometimes more than, the tones of hues, can it be inferred that the roofs of those 2 passenger cars are a lighter hue than black?


      I have books which document the various reds, greens, yellows, passenger cars wore through the years but they do not address roof hues.

      Note the just barely visible 3 passenger car roofs behind the timber train, to left of passenger cars which are on train, and how dark they appear compared to the 2 passenger cars on the train.

      Is that a difference in reflectance or a difference in hue?

       

      And again, do these passenger car roofs appear light because of reflectance or because of hue?

       

      So, here's what I did about 7 years ago with my slooooooooooooooowly progressing repaint of Bachmann's V&T Silverado set.


      Yeah, I know, V&T 26 was not of the bright and shiny locomotive era, but that's how Bachmann decorated it, so, after repainting the boiler jacketing from sky blue to a 'more realistic' hue I'm taking that and running with it.

      Roofs are tan - and back to that reflectance thing, they appear a slightly lighter tan in image than they do to the eye.

      Locomotive cab roof is light grey, which I've seen used some.

       

      Forrest, I've asked the V&T group, and all I got is that the passenger car & cab roofs were covered with thin sheet metal, which was painted. A prominent historian is Mike Collins (former curator at CSRM, and highly knowledgeable of the V&T), and he says the paint color varied, with gray (on V&T coach #16) being an example. 

       

      So we're not limited to tar / black, which is good to know. If one wanted to stick with colors of typical asbestos fireproof roofing paint of the day, this page by the Pacific Narrow Gauge group is a great resource.  

       

      Cliff

       

    • December 5, 2019 7:12 PM EST
    • Ken Brunt said:
      David Marconi,FOGCH said:

      He seemed to have a wide range of collections. I liked the antique books in the upstairs turret area

      Not to mention the model stationary steam engines. 

      gay ...no Amtrak in this thread

       

    • December 5, 2019 5:35 PM EST
    • David Marconi,FOGCH said:

      He seemed to have a wide range of collections. I liked the antique books in the upstairs turret area

      Not to mention the model stationary steam engines. 

    • December 5, 2019 5:34 PM EST
    • He seemed to have a wide range of collections. I liked the antique books in the upstairs turret area

    • December 5, 2019 5:25 PM EST
    • Hollywood, thanks for the great pics and comments. I totally agree, what a great host; Jay spent two hours with Linda and me, half of it being them talking about Picasso and cubist art (did you notice his collection on the walls in his house?). Anyway, great experience for us, I'm glad you and Ken had it as well.

       

       

    • December 5, 2019 4:54 PM EST
    • Most fascinating and thank you gentleman for the photos.  It wasn't a local trip, I gather, so that in itself is worth praising.

      As a child I lived near an old windmill which had been a flour mill.  I was fortunate in that when it was demolished I had moved away so never saw the destruction.  There are many mills, of varying type here in the UK and I am sure any radio hams will have heard or worked them when it is Mills On The Air.

    • December 5, 2019 3:39 PM EST
    • A few to show the wonder. First the downstairs in his Horizontal windmill

      The shaft up

      Then on to his second windmill the Aermotor. Inside pics

      Getting a full rundown on the mill and how the grain was fed into it

      And one outside view 

      You could not ask for a more accommodating host. We showed up unannounced yet Jay stopped what he was working on and took us on a tour of inside his home to show his fan system then walked us out to the two windmills and gave us an in-depth tour, both on the structures and their operations. Then answered what questions we had and talked of the scarcity of these structures and why they fell to disuse.

      Great time and thank you Cliff for pointing these out to us.

    • December 5, 2019 3:32 AM EST
    • Dave took some pix. Very interesting place, and a very interesting guy. 

      Loved all the belt driven ceiling fans in the house.

    • December 4, 2019 7:51 PM EST
    • Ken Brunt said:
      Rooster ' said:
      Ken Brunt said:

      Hollywood and I were making the trip up to see it tomorrow. We originally planned for today, but the wife needed my car, so we had a change in plans. I'm meeting him at the Delta Family restaurant. Then we'll scoot on over and take a look/see. 

       

       

      Haha!

       

       

      He beat you too it only because you excluded me from your plans !

      Soooooooo, tell me about your trip to Pittsburg over the weekend. Fun stuff, huh.................

      Seems Hollywood has a Mrs Kravitz attitude these days. But that has nothing to do with Cliffs thread.

       

      Useful Pics...for Cliffs thread today Ken or it never happened?

    • December 4, 2019 6:36 PM EST
    • Would still love to go Fred! 

       

      And as far as windmill trips go, I hear that Ken and Hollywood got over to Jay's today... before the Turbine's electrical issues were fixed...  But sounds like you guys got to see the big Aermotor run?

       

      Dan, funny thing about those Iranian windmills, I'd just sent that video link to Jay (of PA windmill fame) the day before you posted it here, so it was very fresh in my memory! Great story, but I hope some folks step up to preserve them.

    • December 6, 2019 4:38 PM EST
    • I'd have to say if the engineer can't see that station he better get his eyes checked, great looking station, Bill

    • December 6, 2019 2:06 PM EST
    • I must have forgotten you had a McCown Freight on your RR when I decided on a similar name McCown Freight Forwarding for an industry on my RR and an unfinished Challenge project from a few years back.  I guess Bob is a mogul in the shipping industry with multiple locations.  Re-work looks good, but will look better in the spring (assuming you are leaving out) once the gloss fades a bit

    • December 6, 2019 2:00 PM EST
    • Nice model and great renovation Bruce.  I guess it behoves many of us to put our structures on our winter railroad programme.

    • December 6, 2019 1:43 PM EST
    • Spiffy!..............

    • December 6, 2019 1:18 PM EST
    • Well, FINALLY got this done...

      Ken had the right idea - instead of scraping off the old shingles, just get some new acrylic sheets and use them.    So, I threw out the old roof and started afresh - much easier.  I had dreams of redoing the windows with clear acrylic, but whatever glue I used back then has held up too well for THAT to work.   So, a repaint was fairly easy, and I covered all of the wood (shingles included) with a coat of boiled linseed oil.   These shingles are a bit thicker than the original, so I'm hoping they will hold up to the elements (including acorns) a lot better.

      I had to replace one of the figures - the original had been decapitated!   (The squirrels are prime suspects!)

       

      Looks pretty nice, but THIS will be the NORMAL viewing angle:

    • December 5, 2019 11:55 AM EST
    • Rooster ' said:
      Ken Brunt said:

      I have thought about doing that, Todd and stick it up by the new building. Kind of a before and after.............

      You don't think about nothing but breakfast !

      Probably bacon and eggs ....

       

    • December 4, 2019 8:18 PM EST
    • Ken Brunt said:

      I have thought about doing that, Todd and stick it up by the new building. Kind of a before and after.............

      You don't think about nothing but breakfast !