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  • Topic: Nothing like an 8lb, 3.6kg, train book in the mail

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    • November 13, 2019 2:05 PM EST
      • Missouri, It's like Floodsburg, man
         
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      Nothing like an 8lb, 3.6kg, train book in the mail

      Nothing like receiving an 8 pound, 3.6kg, train book in the mail.

      Had been wanting it for a couple decades - found Friends of San Francisco Library selling one on Amazon for about $30, which sure beats original list price when your current income is Social Security Disability!

      Am pretty sure the majority of its weight is created by the nice slick clay-coated paper.

       

    • November 13, 2019 2:30 PM EST
      • Ormond Beach, Fl. 32174
         
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      Looks like a very knowledge filled informative book, now you can answer questions for money, LOL, great find Bill

    • November 13, 2019 3:06 PM EST
      • Missouri, It's like Floodsburg, man
         
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      It is!
      I also have his Early American Locomotives book and his 2-volume American Railroad Passenger Cars book.


      This about the author should give a sense of what manner of book it is,


      As soon as he graduated he got an internship position as a museum aide at the Smithsonian Institution. His early years at the Smithsonian Institution were spent working on ship models for Howard I. Chapelle, the curator of transportation. His internship was extended from time to time until his position as made permanent in 1960, when he became an associate curator in the Land Transportation Section. From 1961 until 1966 he was an associate curator of railroads at the Museum of History and Technology (renamed the National Museum of American History, curator from 1967–1985, and senior historian from 1986 until his retirement in 1989.

       

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_H._White_Jr.

      This post was edited by Forrest Scott Wood at November 13, 2019 3:06 PM EST
    • November 13, 2019 5:29 PM EST
      • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
         
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      Now, when I have a question on that subject matter, I know who to ask.

      ____________________________________

      Shannon car Shops
      Home of the infamous leg lamp

      I.A.R.R.R. Member #12

      and King Butt Modeler

    • November 13, 2019 7:39 PM EST
      • Missouri, It's like Floodsburg, man
         
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      David Maynard said:

      Now, when I have a question on that subject matter, I know who to ask.

      What's funny is that back when I was doing the WW2 miniatures games and associated 1/72 scale figures and models & participating in a couple forums I was actually that kind of person, "Oh! That's in a book over on the shelf, gimme a minute!" And I often knew which page!

      And I had some tank and vehicle books of this caliber authored by a Richard P. Hunnicutt, including a hundred dollar Sherman and US medium tanks history book, and an equally priced Stuart and light tanks book, each of which I bought with overtime from the auto auction.

      I won't go in to the reasons why, but something happened in 2005 to where I Can't do the military history, games, and models, any more, so all those books and miniatures have been sold or given away.

      Back to the freight cars book, took it to look at while a friend with MS was having PT, I am doing the driving. First 100 or so pages cover the doing of railroading in the 1800s, operations, yards, sales and rates, permanent way construction and bridges or not, car ferries, job functions of train crews, so forth and so on.

      Even has 2 to 4 pages about canals, another interest.

    • November 13, 2019 7:56 PM EST
      • Vail, Az
         
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      May I suggest another tome for the throne room.

      Treasury of Railroad Folklore, A Botkin & Harlow Stories Tall Tales Traditions

      It will complete your knowledge

      ____________________________________

      John

       

      The older I get, the less I know, please don't make me prove it.

       

       

    • November 14, 2019 12:35 AM EST
      • Southern Oregon
         
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      Forrest,

      I also have the books by White, very valuable reference materials. Good score 

    • November 14, 2019 10:20 PM EST
      • Highland, Maryland
         
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      Forrest Scott Wood said:

      Nothing like receiving an 8 pound, 3.6kg, train book in the mail. 

      Had been wanting it for a couple decades - found Friends of San Francisco Library selling one on Amazon for about $30, which sure beats original list price when your current income is Social Security Disability!

       

      Thanks Forrest, I'd not thought of box cars in that evolutionary sense. I'll have to look out for that book opportunity. 

       

       

    • November 14, 2019 11:37 PM EST
      • Missouri, It's like Floodsburg, man
         
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      Took it with me yesterday to look at while a friend with MS was getting physical therapy, I did the driving. Book's first 100 pages or so cover what I'll call 'the doing of railroading' in the 1800s and cover it pretty comprehensively in the number of specific topics covered. Of course the coverage of that comprehensive list of topics/factors is not comprehensive coverage in this book. Even canals get a mention. Even societal and cultural attitudes toward freight trains in general and freight cars specifically are mentioned. Other factors mentioned: cost of bridges; train speeds and management, crew, shipper, attitudes toward them; train crew sizes and functions; signalling; yard sizes, location, construction; setting of freight rates; telegraphy and signalling; and a number more factors.

      And it appears no previous owner ever read pages 6 and 7.
      Fortunately could remedy that with an X-Acto knife kept as standard equipment in my book bag.

      This post was edited by Forrest Scott Wood at November 14, 2019 11:45 PM EST
    • November 15, 2019 12:39 AM EST
      • Southern Oregon
         
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      Forrest,

      I bought a book a number of years ago on the V&T from the supporting museum and when I got home to read it, found a large number of pages un-cut as you show plus a large number of un-printed pages.  Made it kind of problematic understanding the story of the railroad

    • November 15, 2019 4:02 AM EST
      • KENILWORTH, WARWICKSHIRE UK. (Just up the road from Stratford-Upon-Avon)
         
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      Talking of weighty books..I have Vols 1 & 2 of the Darjeeling history  "Iron Sherpa".. clay coated pages...too heavy to hold for bedtime reading!

      Seems these have become collectors items.   Not surprised as they contain  scale drawings of every bit of rolling stock ever owned by the railway!

      Now,  if only I could afford the B class model steam loco!

      This post was edited by Ross Mansell at November 15, 2019 4:08 AM EST
    • November 15, 2019 6:37 PM EST
      • Missouri, It's like Floodsburg, man
         
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      Rick Marty said:

       plus a large number of un-printed pages. 

      Oh! That would have been a bit of a surprise.

    • November 15, 2019 6:42 PM EST
      • Missouri, It's like Floodsburg, man
         
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      Ross Mansell said:

      Now,  if only I could afford the B class model steam loco!

      This is the closest to that which I could afford.
      Gosh, have had it about 30 years now.

      White block is where I write my name on it way back when taking to college or to work sometimes.

      This post was edited by Forrest Scott Wood at November 15, 2019 6:48 PM EST
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