Forum Sponsorsss


Forums General General Discussion
  • Topic: New Guy form Dayton

    Back To Topics
    (0 rates)
    • June 2, 2019 4:16 PM EDT
      • Deer Park, Washington
         
      • Posts
        12,542
      • Thanks
        550
      • Thanked
        346

      Sam asked if the LGB track cleaner would be a good investment.

       

      Everybody that has one sings it's praises.  It seems to do what it is designed to do.  I don't have one, nor do I personally know anyone thats does.

       

      When I had track power, I used a fiberglass drywall sander, mounted on a "man helper" (broom handle).  Don't use sand paper, no matter how fouled the track is, that just puts micro scratches in the track surface that get filled with gunk, and are next to impossible to clean.  Alcohol, acetone, or other solvent, used sparingly, then wiped clean (remember your plastic ties) work well for seriously fouled track.

       

      The nice thing about battery power is that fouled track just adds traction.

      ____________________________________

      Not only does my mind wander, sometimes it walks off completely.

       

      Some people try to turn back their odometers.  Not me.  I want people to know why I look this way.  I've traveled a long way, and some of the roads weren't paved.  Will Rogers.

    • June 2, 2019 4:23 PM EDT
      • Be Nice or STFU
         
      • Posts
        9,249
      • Thanks
        241
      • Thanked
        835

      I had the LGB track cleaner. It requires a fair amount of maintenance, and the maintenance parts are not cheap.

      I preferred the drywall sander as Steve mentioned for the brief time I had brass track.

       

      Now with stainless, I only wipe off the rails of bugs and the black grime that is on every track powered layout. It has been shown recently in the smaller scales you really want an organic cleaner as opposed to a solvent, and the cleaner in the Swiffer wet wipes, teamed with their "pole sander" base works wonders on this grime. Note: it will not remove oxidation unless you saturate the pad with CLR or Zep lime/calcium cleaner (acid).

       

      Greg

      ____________________________________

      Be sure­ to visit ­my site, l­ots of tec­hnical tip­s and modi­fications,­ and you c­an search ­for topics­ and key w­ords.


      ­Click HERE for Greg­'s web sit­e
      PLEASE NOT­E: Please do NOT use private messaging, i­f you have­ a questio­n, feel fr­ee to emai­l me priva­tely, u­se regular­ email onl­y: greg@el­massian.co­m

    • June 2, 2019 4:27 PM EDT
      • Deer Park, Washington
         
      • Posts
        12,542
      • Thanks
        550
      • Thanked
        346

      Greg Elmassian said:

      I had the LGB track cleaner. It requires a fair amount of maintenance, and the maintenance parts are not cheap.

      I preferred the drywall sander as Steve mentioned for the brief time I had brass track.

       

      Now with stainless, I only wipe off the rails of bugs and the black grime that is on every track powered layout. It has been shown recently in the smaller scales you really want an organic cleaner as opposed to a solvent, and the cleaner in the Swiffer wet wipes, teamed with their "pole sander" base works wonders on this grime. Note: it will not remove oxidation unless you saturate the pad with CLR or Zep lime/calcium cleaner (acid).

       

      Greg

      Thanks, Greg.  It's been a long time since I've had to clean track.  

      ____________________________________

      Not only does my mind wander, sometimes it walks off completely.

       

      Some people try to turn back their odometers.  Not me.  I want people to know why I look this way.  I've traveled a long way, and some of the roads weren't paved.  Will Rogers.

    • June 2, 2019 5:20 PM EDT
      • People's Republic Of Maryland, USA
         
      • Posts
        2,065
      • Thanks
        1,318
      • Thanked
        950

      Same benefits with nickle plated brass, which is readily available. Not sure how available stainless track & switches are these days, I thought they were hard to find, but I could well be incorrect on that.

       

       

    • June 2, 2019 5:36 PM EDT
      • Be Nice or STFU
         
      • Posts
        9,249
      • Thanks
        241
      • Thanked
        835

      Actually nickel plated brass has less voltage drop than solid stainless under DC, but stainless is better for DCC due to the skin effect, not current carrying but signal integrity.

       

      Greg

      ____________________________________

      Be sure­ to visit ­my site, l­ots of tec­hnical tip­s and modi­fications,­ and you c­an search ­for topics­ and key w­ords.


      ­Click HERE for Greg­'s web sit­e
      PLEASE NOT­E: Please do NOT use private messaging, i­f you have­ a questio­n, feel fr­ee to emai­l me priva­tely, u­se regular­ email onl­y: greg@el­massian.co­m

    • June 2, 2019 7:22 PM EDT
      • Rooster Works "Area 69" ,
         
      • Posts
        14,302
      • Thanks
        2,304
      • Thanked
        1,390

      Steve Featherkile said:

      Sam asked if the LGB track cleaner would be a good investment.

       

      Everybody that has one sings it's praises.  It seems to do what it is designed to do.  I don't have one, nor do I personally know anyone thats does.

       

       

      Sean owns one I believe

    • June 2, 2019 7:53 PM EDT
      • Rooster Works "Area 69" ,
         
      • Posts
        14,302
      • Thanks
        2,304
      • Thanked
        1,390

      Sam,

       For my RR I decided to hard solder the "brass" rail sections in 15' lengths as recommended by Jack Verducci (one man can handle them) and he is a smart man IMO!

      Basically if you would hard solder your entire RR it equates to 8 gauge solid core wire. However once again I am no expert and only an infamous Rooster that enjoys sharing personal experiences of finds and fails.

       

       

       

       

       

      Rooster awaits to be proved incorrect and look like an idiot

    • June 2, 2019 8:16 PM EDT
      • Pleasanton, CA
         
      • Posts
        1,030
      • Thanks
        1,122
      • Thanked
        752

      Rooster:

       

      Very entertaining how different various styles are. Daniel Smith suggested that I wanted shorter lengths of track to get more "clickity clack" from the wheels. So I ended up cutting my 6 foot aluminum (Llagas Creek 250 gauge) into 3 foot lengths. Only 2 years old, so far no problem (but there's plenty of time left). And of course I'm battery powered, so there's that.

       

      I do get a lot of nice clickity clack though...

       

      Have fun with all this advice, Sam!

    • June 2, 2019 8:26 PM EDT
      • Rooster Works "Area 69" ,
         
      • Posts
        14,302
      • Thanks
        2,304
      • Thanked
        1,390

      Greg Elmassian said:

       

      If you put a tighter curve in the middle, you get 4 "jerks".

       

      The fewer jerks we have in our hobby, the less there is to fowl things up.

       

      Greg

       

      Jim ,

       Nothing wrong with 4 jerks in the hobby to fowl things up ......I personally like my rail clack with barely any voltage drop on track power not running DCC .

    • June 2, 2019 9:01 PM EDT
      • Kailua, HI
         
      • Posts
        623
      • Thanks
        380
      • Thanked
        388

      Sam,

       

      Welcome back ashore!  It sounds like your experiences mirror mine - collected a bunch of LGB, put it in a box, did the Navy thing, got the LGB back, had to figure out what to do with it.

       

      I am not going to argue with the technical advice above.   I have learned a lot from these guys and gals over the five years since we broke ground on the Oberammergau, Ogden & Olomana RR (aka the Triple O), and I continue to learn from them. Information so freely shared has saved me time and money and helped me to overcome some errors of my own.

       

      If I can make a suggestion as a relative newbie, though, it would be to avoid analysis paralysis, take what you have, and get something going. As you can guess from the name, this a polyglot of equipment with little cohesive sense beyond "it looked cool when I bought it in 1985."  One of the things I - and we - go by though is not what we have now but where we want to take the project going forward.  I have just enough stuff to go all in German Alps (Oberammergau) or all in Wild West (Ogden), but we take the strategic guide of the Oahu Rail & Land and the sundry sugar cane roads of the Kingdom / Republic / Territory of Hawai'i.  This has helped us to focus purchases, from rockwork to rolling stock so that over time we may get to where we want to be and, in the meantime, have fun learning about Hawaii's history with na ka'a ahi (fire coaches).  If I had waited until I had the entirety of this thing worked out, I'd still be scrapping for cash to but LGB's Olomana instead of enjoying the Triple O.  There was nothing like seeing a train move to get the rest of the family excited and to  knock loose a few extra dollars for plants, track, rocks, and, yes, the occasional piece of rolling stock (CINCHOUSE has yet to authorize Olomana…).

      In short, take what you have, get it on the ground, wire it up, and see how it runs before you put shovel to ground.   You can test your track plan, dicker with rail clamps, monkey with grades, etc. to your hearts content without spending a dime as you enjoy your trains do their thing in a temporary "feldbahn" setting. It will also give you a real opportunity to explore view angles, natural undulations in the ground, flood zones, and whatever.  We did  this over a pair of Advent / Christmas seasons for two years before I got permission to break ground.   Then, do what I didn't do, and add some extra space in your raised bed garden's perimeter to allow for the wider curves in time (For me that time came, as predicted, when I got a larger loco and the thing bound up on a curve.).

       

      To quote my first mentor in the hobby, the late Tom Trigg, "Get outside and get dirty!"  Learning continues to be part of the fun.

       

      Aloha,

      Eric

    • June 3, 2019 1:01 PM EDT
      • Dayton, OH
         
      • Posts
        39
      • Thanks
        56
      • Thanked
        0

      Good stuff! Lots of perspectives and that is what I need.   I like the idea of the "drywall sander" as the LGB track clean loco is $600+!!!  So, that motivates me to use the elbow grease method first.  As for your baby-steps-first approach Eric (thanks for the welcome), I get that.  But, I am inclined with COMNAVPOTS&PANS (probably not socially appropriate term anymore) green light on this project, to strike while the iron is hot.  My approach was to center my railroad around the pond (I made a big pond before while stationed in Maryland - NAS Pax River) which my wife is passionate about - me too.  So I have been doing research on the whole set up (RR and pond) for quite some time.  However, I have exposed my weakness of RR layout logistics, but I will overcome that with help from all of the willing participants around here that are willing to part with their $.02 worth of expertise/opinions.  BTW, I reworked a few things and am now getting TRAX Editor to cooperate on my ipad and am making some progress.  I will post my design just as soon as I have something worthy that you can (laugh at) review.

       

      Thanks!

      This post was edited by Sam Griffith at June 3, 2019 2:01 PM EDT
    • June 3, 2019 5:16 PM EDT
      • Deer Park, Washington
         
      • Posts
        12,542
      • Thanks
        550
      • Thanked
        346

      Jim Rowson said:

      Rooster:

       

      Very entertaining how different various styles are. Daniel Smith suggested that I wanted shorter lengths of track to get more "clickity clack" from the wheels. So I ended up cutting my 6 foot aluminum (Llagas Creek 250 gauge) into 3 foot lengths. Only 2 years old, so far no problem (but there's plenty of time left). And of course I'm battery powered, so there's that.

       

      I do get a lot of nice clickity clack though...

       

      Have fun with all this advice, Sam!

      It's not necessary to completely cut through the track to get the "clickity-clack."  A triangular file works quite well to cut a 1/64" cross scratch for the metal wheels to sound against.

      ____________________________________

      Not only does my mind wander, sometimes it walks off completely.

       

      Some people try to turn back their odometers.  Not me.  I want people to know why I look this way.  I've traveled a long way, and some of the roads weren't paved.  Will Rogers.

    • June 4, 2019 9:39 PM EDT
      • Dayton, OH
         
      • Posts
        39
      • Thanks
        56
      • Thanked
        0

      Here is a rendering from TRAX Editor.  After suggestions received here and some research, I am inclined to try flex track for max flexibility in my layout design and a more realistic look.

      As I mentioned earlier, my design is derived from some limitations I have:  a pond toward the center and two gardens to the left and right at the bottom of my track layout.  Am still trying to figure how to get the drawing of water, dirt, trees, etc working in TRAX editor - any help would be appreciated. 

      Edit:  Thanks Mike B. for bringing forth my photo (next post)!!!

      96BF3991-67A4-460E-8684-7EEDFB2104AA.png (1.5 Mb)
      This post was edited by Sam Griffith at June 4, 2019 10:20 PM EDT
    • June 4, 2019 9:44 PM EDT
      • Winmalee, NSW Australia
         
      • Posts
        124
      • Thanks
        241
      • Thanked
        36

    • June 4, 2019 10:33 PM EDT
      • Be Nice or STFU
         
      • Posts
        9,249
      • Thanks
        241
      • Thanked
        835

      so now work hard to get rid of the 5' diameter R2 curves, even the R3 are tight and you will find some locos will not work.

       

      give up a few feet of track to enjoy much better running. Historically, once someone makes an extensive layout working within water features and a garden, it's almost impossible and it's too daunting to make wholesale changes later.

       

      Sure, some people will come up and say it's easy to change track, but MOST people I have talked to over the last 20 years would disagree.

       

       I went back to the beginning of the thread, and you say you have been collecting LGB for 30 years and like German stuff, so R2 will be fine for all your LGB (that can run on R1) BUT remember if you try running anything else, you will probably have issues.

       

      If you are firmly committed to not go "beyond" LGB, R2 is safe, but don't even think about a big narrow gauge loco, or US mainline stuff.

       

      Just trying to be helpful and get you to be SURE before hand.

       

      With the varying curvatures you have indicated, flex track might give you smoother curves, but be aware you can recurve sectional track also.

       

      Best, Greg

      This post was edited by Greg Elmassian at June 6, 2019 7:34 PM EDT
      ____________________________________

      Be sure­ to visit ­my site, l­ots of tec­hnical tip­s and modi­fications,­ and you c­an search ­for topics­ and key w­ords.


      ­Click HERE for Greg­'s web sit­e
      PLEASE NOT­E: Please do NOT use private messaging, i­f you have­ a questio­n, feel fr­ee to emai­l me priva­tely, u­se regular­ email onl­y: greg@el­massian.co­m

    • June 6, 2019 3:33 PM EDT
      • Dayton, OH
         
      • Posts
        39
      • Thanks
        56
      • Thanked
        0

      Thanks Greg - good input.  Yes, I am all in with the Euro locos/cars but will keep in mind my limitations should I go for larger Euro locos.  So, will my 0-6-6-0 Mallet have any issues with R2 radius?

    • June 6, 2019 7:37 PM EDT
      • Rooster Works "Area 69" ,
         
      • Posts
        14,302
      • Thanks
        2,304
      • Thanked
        1,390

      Greg Elmassian said:

       

       I went back to the beginning of the thread, and you say you have been collecting LGB for 30 years and like German stuff, so R2 will be fine for all your LGB (that can run on R1) BUT remember if you try running anything else, you will probably have issues.

       

      Rooster: thanks Greg for re-reading from the beginning before posting as recommended by Greg.

    • June 6, 2019 7:42 PM EDT
      • Rooster Works "Area 69" ,
         
      • Posts
        14,302
      • Thanks
        2,304
      • Thanked
        1,390

      Sam,

       Where is the pond located on the drawing that you and your wife are passionate about? Would love to see pics of the pond as I'm envious of one myself but have way too many large trees for the maintenance.

    • June 7, 2019 12:46 AM EDT
      • Peoria, NW of Phoenix, Arizona
         
      • Posts
        1,405
      • Thanks
        250
      • Thanked
        307

      Joe Zullo said:

      OK this link I can cut up and work with to display the photo for you...

      Right there Rooster!!!

      i think it’s the area with the letters P O N and D written in it, but  I may be wrong as I didn’t read the OP ‘s post and do go to Greg’s page for helpful information about trains

      This post was edited by Pete Lassen at June 7, 2019 9:08 PM EDT
      ____________________________________

       

      Butt Modeler #2

       

       

    • June 7, 2019 6:39 AM EDT
      • Dayton, OH
         
      • Posts
        39
      • Thanks
        56
      • Thanked
        0

      Ha ha ha ...... too funny!!

Forums General General Discussion

    Icon Legend

  • Topic has replies
    Hot topic
    Topic unread
    Topic doesn't have any replies
    Closed topic
    BBCode  is enabled
    HTML  is enabled

Add Reputation

Do you want to add reputation for this user by this post?

or cancel

Ads by Google