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  • Topic: Contemplating a switch in scale

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    • March 28, 2019 8:24 PM EDT
      • Columbia, Maryland
         
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      Thank you to everyone that contributed to the thread. It has been very informative, and I have learned a great deal. I believe you all will be seeing some of my 1:24 scale endeavors in the future. 

    • April 15, 2019 7:50 PM EDT
      • Columbia, Maryland
         
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      Hate to bring this up again   , but I have had a change in plan. After I did more extensive looking into 1:24 scale, I found there was a lack of more modern narrow gauge equipment (not that narrow gauge equipment was usually new). While the 1880's was a neat time period for narrow gauge, I prefer the 1930's-1950's. So, it would seem that there is more modern equipment available in 1:22.5 scale. Before, I had cast off this scale as not having the fidelity I was looking for. In reality, the scale fidelity between 1:22 and 1:24 is about the same. The scale fidelity of every piece of equipment, regardless of scale, seems to vary. Another factor driving this decision was LGB's D&RGW diesel #50, which is one of my favorite locos of all time. In making this choice, I will have to give up a wide variety of autos, and the simplicity of converting plans to 1:24 (although a scale ruler will make this easier). I am willing to accept these shortcomings, and I think most of the U.S. equipment available in 1:22 will fulfill my wishes. I look forward to building and acquiring items in this "new" scale. 

       

      Edit: The other thing I forgot to mention is track gauge. Instead of modeling 42" gauge in 1:24, the gauge in 1:22 roughly works out to 40" gauge. Not completely accurate, but close enough to 42" gauge for me.

      This post was edited by Joe Loll at April 15, 2019 8:15 PM EDT
    • April 15, 2019 8:38 PM EDT
      • Shut Up Rooster
         
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      So, many of the benefits of 1:24 are not in 1:22... so is 1:22 going to be enough smaller to make it worthwhile?

       

      You began the thread by saying 1:20.3 was too big..

       

      Greg

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    • April 15, 2019 11:14 PM EDT
      • Denver, Colorado
         
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      Joe Loll said:

      ....In making this choice, I will have to give up a wide variety of autos, and the simplicity of converting plans to 1:24 (although a scale ruler will make this easier). .....

       

         I don't think you have to give up your 1:24 autos; they'll work just fine with 1:22. Hell, most of the "1:24" diecast cars are a little bigger, or smaller, than 1:24 anyway.

       

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    • April 16, 2019 1:52 AM EDT

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      Joe, realize that much of the "modern" 1:22.5 stuff is a little fudged for scale. Take LGB's White Pass diesel and Uintah mallet. Both are ridiculously undersized compared to their prototypes. Both prototypes pushed over 10' wide; the LGB models are barely 4.5" wide, so in terms of scale, they come in closer to 1:26 in some dimensions. On the flip side, you have LGB's Porter and Forney which are closer to 1:19. That's LGB's "one size fits all" strategy at work. 

       

      Later,

       

      K

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    • April 16, 2019 7:15 AM EDT
      • Eastern Massachusetts
         
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      Note that LGB always said they make toys!!

    • April 16, 2019 9:56 AM EDT
      • Columbia, Maryland
         
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      Thank y'all for all the good feedback. 

       

      Greg, Yeah, I still think 1:22 is small enough for me. It will still fit in with other's 1:29-1:22 scale trains. Ii is small enough not to feel oversize like 20.3, particularly if you like smaller engines and cars like myself.

       

      John, while others use 1:24 scale autos with 1:22, I am trying to have a true to scale layout, so I will use as many things in 1:22 as I possibly can. The only 1:22 scale cars I have found thus far are the Hubley Packard, the Ertl Bantam, and the Bburbago Rolls Royce. 

       

      Kevin, I realize most LGB is not exactly 1:22. But if I remember correctly, the mogul and the Davenport are about accurate in 1:22. Bachmann also makes a couple more accurately scaled locos. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think most of the LGB rolling stock is about 1:22, though probably shortened somewhat. I don't mind if the cars are a little short.

       

      Dan, that is a fair point. Considering the fact that LGB was derived from a toy manufacturer, it makes perfect sense!

       

      Yes, there are some significant aspects that I loose in 1:22, but the equipment I like just doesn't seem to all be there. The majority of 1:24 scale stuff is mostly late 1800's stock (i.e., Hartland steamers and rolling stock, Aristo C-16 and rolling stock, Lionel 0-6-0). The modern equipment in 1:24 can be counted on one hand: Piko 25 ton, Hartland Mack, MDC Big Hustler, Aristo C-16, MDC/Piko caboose. So while there are a couple pieces of modern stock in 1:24, it would seem better suited to someone interested in modeling the 1800's. While there are critters in 1:24 as I had wanted, there is a definite lack of small steam loco's like 0-4-0's, and the more modern steam I was looking for was hard to come by. In 1:22 scale, there is the LGB mogul, the infamous Annie, the Lyn, and the #50. I am not a fan of Bachmann's rolling stock, but the LGB rolling stock looks pretty good for the most part, and USA trains has some stock in 1:22. I'm intending to use some small diesel locos from other scales to satisfy my need for critters, as industrial locos came in a wide variety of sizes. Lastly, although the gauge will be incorrect, it is only about 2" too narrow from 42" gauge, which isn't a big deal for me.

       

        1:24 is a nice size and scale combo, but I'm really not a the point where I can scratch build things that I want and aren't available, and it would seem that 1:24 scale stock is harder to come by than other scales. 

       

      This post was edited by Joe Loll at April 17, 2019 8:38 AM EDT
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