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  • Topic: LGB Genesis - RCS battery power - Dallee sound.

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    • February 17, 2011 5:48 AM EST

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      Today I shipped out the first LGB Genesis diesel I have seen after kitting it out with RCS battery power and Dallee sound. The Genesis would have to be as good an example of LGB craftsmanship ever to grace the shelves. It is superb. Made in China to boot. Well designed internally and superbly engineered. Everything fits perfectly and it is easy to get apart and put back together again. The only real problem I had was fitting a speaker. I cannot obtain one locally that would be a drop in fit. I did have one with almost the exact diameter but it had square mounting holes that did not line up with the LGB positions. I used my trusty 5 watt Altronics 8 ohm speaker as the starting point. Gordon Watson kindly removed the corners with heavy duty metal shears and then turned the rim down to fit the space.

      The original is on the right. Then I simply glued it in place in the LGB provided mounting ring.

      After that the rest was pretty straightforward. I moved the original LGB pcb and wiring loom from the weights and re-routed the wiring up above the plastic braces to the new position of the LGB lighting power pcb. See last pic. That freed up a lot of space on the weights and over the speaker. I glued sheet styrene in place and then glued the various components in place on the styrene.

      A wider sheet of styrene to support the 2 x 7.2 volt 2500 mah Sub C NiCd batteries was glued to the front weight after I removed the front internal brace to make room for the battery packs.

      As I was feeding the LGB motors direct from the ESC 14.4 volts is plenty fast enough without the voltage lowering stock LGB pcb. The only cutting of the body was to the internal end piece so that I could mount the charge jack at the rear. I temporarily removed the internal end plate and reamed out the square hole for the external plug so that the charge jack would fit through far enough to get a nut on the outside of the body.

      I did file some grooves on the underside of the braces that straddle the weights, to enable cables to be passed between the brace and the weights.

      This last pic is largely self explanatory. I mounted the master ON - OFF switch and programming pushbutton on one of the internal braces under the removable hatch. This hatch makes access to the switch, pushbutton and Dallee volume control a snip. The old LGB cables I moved can be seen running through this space but do not get in the way.

      The original LGB lighting pcb is mounted upside down under the roof on a piece of styrene glued to the roof. There is simply no need to rewire the loco. I feed fused full traction battery voltage to this pcb. Polarity reversing is handled by a small pcb I make that has two SPDT relays controlled by the RCS lighting outputs. The constant brightness lights are off when the system is in neutral, but will come on instantly when either direction is selected. Nice and simple and very reliable. The Dallee sound quality is aided by the good quality speaker I fitted. Apart from regular engine rev up when moving, the operator will have Horn, Bell, Forced Notch 8 and motor rumble OFF-ON. Once again, fantastic range thanks to the 2.4 GHz Radio. Extra motor "noise" suppression is NOT needed. Next up will be either the Accucraft Black 5 electric powered steam outline loco I have started on, or an updated installation in the Bachmann Mallet. Cheers.
      ____________________________________

      Best wishes,
      Tony Walsham

      Remote Control Systems. www.rcs-rc.com/
        Modern technology. Old Fashioned reliability

    • February 17, 2011 6:13 AM EST
      • Missouri, It's like Floodsburg, man
         
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      TonyWalsham said:
      Gordon Watson kindly removed the corners with heavy duty metal shears and then turned the rim down to fit the space.
      He's got more guts than I do: I'd be too anxious about damaging the speaker to do that.
    • February 17, 2011 6:27 AM EST

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      Gordon Watson is a metal craftsman. As the owner/builder of Argyle Live steam gems, he is highly skilled working with such simple jobs as that.
      The speakers are actually quite low cost for 5 watt mylar cones. About US$6.50 each.
      ____________________________________

      Best wishes,
      Tony Walsham

      Remote Control Systems. www.rcs-rc.com/
        Modern technology. Old Fashioned reliability

    • February 17, 2011 5:56 PM EST
      • South Central , PA
         
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      :)
    • February 18, 2011 2:58 PM EST

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      I use a belt sander on a stand to grind off the corners of "square" speakers, very easy to do, but cover the speaker with blue tape since the metal filings will try to get all over the place.

      Greg
      ____________________________________

      Be sure­ to visit ­my site, l­ots of tec­hnical tip­s and modi­fications,­ and you c­an search ­for topics­ and key w­ords.


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    • February 18, 2011 6:16 PM EST
      • South Central , PA
         
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      Greg Elmassian said:
      I use a belt sander on a stand to grind off the corners of "square" speakers, very easy to do, but cover the speaker with blue tape since the metal filings will try to get all over the place. Greg
      Always wear your safety glasses :)
    • February 19, 2011 8:36 AM EST
      • Candlewood Valley, Connecticut
         
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      Greg Elmassian said:
      I use a belt sander on a stand to grind off the corners of "square" speakers, very easy to do, but cover the speaker with blue tape since the metal filings will try to get all over the place. Greg
      If the filings somehow find their way to the gap in the magnet, the speaker will be toast.
      ____________________________________

      www.cvsry.com www.cvsry.com

    • February 19, 2011 10:33 AM EST

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      Yes I know, but of course that would be pretty hard to happen...

      The front of the speaker is sealed, and the back usually has a cloth surround... so I suppose an extremely fine powder could get in there

      But I still wrap the back of the speaker because I don't like mess... I sand the edges off, then blow off with compressed air and remove the tape. It's a 5 minute job.

      Oh, I've done this dozens of times successfully.

      Was trying to give a tip to save time. I don't like using metal shears because they can distort metal, especially curved surfaces.

      Regards, Greg
      ____________________________________

      Be sure­ to visit ­my site, l­ots of tec­hnical tip­s and modi­fications,­ and you c­an search ­for topics­ and key w­ords.


      ­Click HERE for Greg­'s web sit­e
      PLEASE NOT­E: Please do NOT use private messaging, i­f you have­ a questio­n, feel fr­ee to emai­l me priva­tely, u­se regular­ email onl­y: [email protected]­massian.co­m

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